Arthritis Articles A-Z

Tylonol - What Is Allopurinol Used For?

This page contains links to eMedTV Arthritis Articles containing information on subjects from Tylonol to What Is Allopurinol Used For?. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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  • Tylonol
    Tylenol is a nonprescription drug used to reduce pain and fever in both adults and children. This eMedTV Web page briefly describes the various products and lists possible side effects of the drug. Tylonol is a common misspelling of Tylenol.
  • Types of Arthritis
    This page on the eMedTV site gives an overview of the various categories of arthritis (including inflammatory arthritis and hemorrhagic arthritis) and the types of arthritis within those categories (such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis).
  • Types of Glucosamine
    Of the various types of glucosamine, the sulfate variety may be the most effective for treating arthritis. This eMedTV Web page describes the three different types of glucosamine and explores their similarities and differences.
  • Types of Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis
    Cases of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis may be classified as pauciarticular, polyarticular, or systemic. This eMedTV Web page discusses the three types of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and explains what makes them different from each other.
  • Uloric
    Uloric is a prescribed drug used to prevent gout attacks by reducing uric acid levels in the body. This eMedTV Web article describes how the medicine works, offers dosing information, and explains what you should know before starting treatment.
  • Uloric and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV page explains that it is not known if Uloric (febuxostat) passes through breast milk in humans. This article further discusses breastfeeding and Uloric, explaining why it is probably best for women to avoid this medication while breastfeeding.
  • Uloric and Pregnancy
    It is not known if it is safe to use Uloric (febuxostat) during pregnancy. As this eMedTV page explains, animal studies on pregnancy and Uloric show that the drug may cause problems in the fetus, such as decreased survival rates and body weights.
  • Uloric Dosage
    The recommended starting dosage of Uloric is typically 40 mg once daily. This page from eMedTV Web archives takes an in-depth look at this drug's dosing guidelines, including tips on when and how to effectively use this gout medication.
  • Uloric Drug Interactions
    Drug interactions may occur when certain medicines are taken with Uloric. This eMedTV resource offers more information on these interactions, including which medicines may interact with Uloric and the negative effects of these interactions.
  • Uloric Medication Information
    This part of the eMedTV site offers some basic information on Uloric, a prescription gout medication. Topics covered in this article include how to take it, what to discuss with your healthcare provider, and more.
  • Uloric Overdose
    If you think you have taken too much Uloric (febuxostat), seek immediate medical attention. This eMedTV Web resource takes a closer look at the effects of an overdose, and describes possible treatment options that are available.
  • Uloric Side Effects
    Common side effects of Uloric may include nausea and joint pain. This article from the eMedTV Web site describes the potential side effects of this drug in more detail, including a list of serious side effects that require immediate medical attention.
  • Uloric Uses
    As this eMedTV article explains, Uloric is a medication that is used to prevent high uric acid levels in adults who have gout. This resource takes a detailed look the uses of Uloric, including information on how it works and possible "off-label" uses.
  • Uloric Warnings and Precautions
    Uloric can increase your liver enzymes and may increase your risk for heart problems. This eMedTV Web segment contains other important warnings and precautions for Uloric, and also discusses what to tell your doctor before starting the medication.
  • Understanding a Healthy Knee
    The knee is a joint that allows for the motion of your leg, by bending and extending. This video clip covers how a healthy knee works.
  • Understanding Hip Arthritis
    This video describes what causes hip arthritis.
  • Understanding How a Healthy Hip Works
    The hip is a ball-and-socket joint formed by the pelvis and the femur, or thighbone. This multimedia clip gives a tour of a healthy hip.
  • Understanding Knee Arthritis
    This video explains what happens when your knee wears out.
  • Understanding Treatments for Hip Arthritis
    Several different treatments for hip arthritis are available, as this video segment explains.
  • Unstable Implant (Total Knee Replacement Risks)
    This multimedia clip discusses the possibility of the implant becoming unstable after this procedure.
  • Vamovo
    As this eMedTV page explains, Vimovo is a prescription drug used to treat osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis. This article takes a brief look at how this medicine works. Vamovo is a common misspelling of Vimovo.
  • Vascular Damage (Total Knee Replacement Risks)
    This video explains that vascular damage may occur during a total knee replacement.
  • Vascular Injury During a Total Knee Replacement
    Vascular injuries are a rare complication associated with knee replacement surgery. This eMedTV segment discusses why vascular injury during a total knee replacement may occur and how it is treated.
  • Vemovo
    Vimovo is prescribed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. This eMedTV Web page takes a brief look at Vimovo, and provides a link to more detailed information. Vemovo is a common misspelling of Vimovo.
  • Vimovo
    Vimovo is a medication prescribed to treat osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. This eMedTV page offers an in-depth look at this drug, including information on how it works, possible side effects, dosing tips, and more.
  • Vimovo and Breastfeeding
    One of the active ingredients in Vimovo (naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium) passes through human breast milk. This eMedTV page discusses breastfeeding and Vimovo, explaining the potential problems this drug may cause and the manufacturer's recommendations.
  • Vimovo and Pregnancy
    This page from the eMedTV library explains why it may not be safe for pregnant women to take Vimovo (naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium). This article also takes an in-depth look at some of the specific complications this drug may cause during pregnancy.
  • Vimovo Dosage
    Vimovo comes in extended-release tablets and is typically taken twice daily. This page from the eMedTV Web site describes the factors that may affect your dosage of Vimovo and lists some general dosing tips to be aware of with this prescription medicine.
  • Vimovo Drug Interactions
    Potentially dangerous side effects can occur due to Vimovo drug interactions, so this eMedTV page explains how to reduce your risk. This includes a list of the many drugs that cause negative reactions, as well as the complications that can occur.
  • Vimovo Medication Information
    Vimovo is a drug used to treat osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. This eMedTV page offers more information on Vimovo, explaining the medication's dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Vimovo Overdose
    This eMedTV page explains that kidney damage, chest pain, and other problems can occur if someone takes too much Vimovo (naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium). This page lists other possible overdose symptoms and describes available treatment options.
  • Vimovo Side Effects
    Some of the most commonly reported side effects of Vimovo include diarrhea, heartburn, and stomach ulcers. This eMedTV article gives an overview of other possible reactions, including those that are potentially serious and require immediate medical care.
  • Vimovo Uses
    Adults who have osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis may benefit from Vimovo. This eMedTV Web resource further discusses what Vimovo is used for, whether it is safe for children, and how this prescription medicine works.
  • Vimovo Warnings and Precautions
    As this eMedTV resource explains, you may not be able to take Vimovo if you have certain conditions, such as asthma or bleeding problems. This article lists other important warnings and precautions to be aware of before taking Vimovo.
  • Voltaram
    Voltaren is a drug used to treat symptoms of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and other conditions. This eMedTV page covers specific Voltaren uses and describes potential side effects of the drug. Voltaram is a common misspelling of Voltaren.
  • Voltaren
    Voltaren is used to treat symptoms of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, such as pain and stiffness. This eMedTV article explains how the drug works, lists possible side effects, and offers things to consider before taking it.
  • Voltaren and Pregnancy
    As a pregnancy Category C drug, Voltaren could possibly harm a fetus. This eMedTV page highlights other risks this medication can present during pregnancy, such as potential complications during labor and delivery.
  • Voltaren and Weight Gain
    This eMedTV page on Voltaren and weight gain offers tips on combating any gradual weight gain you may experience while taking the drug. This page also explains the link between rapid weight gain and congestive heart failure in people taking Voltaren.
  • Voltaren Dosage
    This page of the eMedTV Web site explains factors that affect a person's Voltaren dosage and provides recommended doses for conditions like rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Tips on taking the medication safely are also provided.
  • Voltaren Drug
    If you have arthritis, you may have heard about Voltaren, an NSAID used for pain, stiffness, and swelling. This eMedTV Web resource takes a quick look at Voltaren, with details on side effects and how long it may take to get results.
  • Voltaren Drug Interactions
    Some of the drugs that Voltaren can potentially interact with include lithium, aspirin, and warfarin. This eMedTV resource describes how these drug interactions can increase the risk of bleeding and kidney damage, among other things.
  • Voltaren Gel
    Voltaren Gel is a prescription NSAID approved for treating osteoarthritis. This eMedTV page explores this product in more detail, noting in particular its side effects, dosing guidelines, and some general precautions to be aware of before using the gel.
  • Voltaren Gel and Breastfeeding
    The manufacturer of Voltaren Gel does not recommend using the product if you are nursing. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at breastfeeding and Voltaren Gel, including what to discuss with your doctor before nursing a child.
  • Voltaren Gel and Pregnancy
    Voltaren Gel may not be safe for women who are expecting. This eMedTV page discusses pregnancy and Voltaren Gel, describing some of the potential risks of using this medication while pregnant and what to do if pregnancy occurs while using this product.
  • Voltaren Gel Dosage
    The maximum dosage of Voltaren Gel is 32 grams total per day. This page of the eMedTV Web site further discusses dosing guidelines for treating upper and lower extremities, and also provides details on when and how to use this gel.
  • Voltaren Gel Drug Information
    This eMedTV page offers important information on Voltaren Gel, a drug used to treat osteoarthritis of the knees, hands, and other areas easily treated with a gel. This page lists available strengths and explains why this drug is not suitable for everyone.
  • Voltaren Gel Drug Interactions
    Skin products, lithium, and diuretics are among the drugs that can potentially interact with Voltaren Gel. This eMedTV segment describes how these and other interactions can increase your risk of bleeding or kidney damage, among other things.
  • Voltaren Gel Overdose
    An overdose of Voltaren Gel may cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and drowsiness. This page from the eMedTV Web library lists other potential overdose symptoms and describes how a doctor may treat an overdose of this medication.
  • Voltaren Gel Side Effects
    Skin reactions at the application site are the most common side effects that can occur with Voltaren Gel. This eMedTV page lists other possible side effects of this product, including potentially serious problems that may require immediate medical care.
  • Voltaren Gel Warnings and Precautions
    Voltaren Gel may not be safe for people with certain medical conditions, such as asthma or kidney disease. This eMedTV page offers other warnings and precautions to be aware of before using Voltaren Gel, including what to discuss with your doctor.
  • Voltaren Precautions and Warnings
    People with high blood pressure, heart failure, or a history of ulcers should take Voltaren with caution. This eMedTV resource offers more Voltaren precautions and warnings, such as potential drug interactions and possible side effects.
  • Voltaren Side Effects
    Typical side effects of Voltaren include gas, constipation, and nausea. This eMedTV resource lists common, rare, and serious side effects of the drug -- as well as side effects that you should report to your doctor right away, such as vomiting blood.
  • Voltaren Uses
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Voltaren is used to relieve pain, stiffness, and swelling caused by a number of conditions, such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. This page also lists off-label uses for Voltaren, like relieving cancer pain.
  • Voltarene
    Voltaren is used for relieving pain and inflammation caused by certain types of arthritis. This eMedTV segment covers Voltaren uses in more detail and explains how to reduce your risk of side effects. Voltarene is a common misspelling of Voltaren.
  • Voltarin
    This eMedTV page briefly describes Voltaren, a drug used to reduce pain, swelling, and stiffness caused by several types of arthritis. A link to more in-depth information is also provided. Voltarin is a common misspelling of Voltaren.
  • Volteran
    Many symptoms of arthritis can be treated with the prescription pain reliever Voltaren. This eMedTV resource describes this drug in more detail and explains how it works to relieve pain and inflammation. Volteran is a common misspelling of Voltaren.
  • Volteran Gel
    Voltaren Gel is a prescription NSAID used to treat osteoarthritis. This eMedTV page explores some of the uses of this product and covers some general precautions to be aware of before using it. Volteran Gel is a common misspelling of Voltaren Gel.
  • Volteren
    Voltaren is used to relieve symptoms of osteoarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. This eMedTV article further explores Voltaren uses and explains what to discuss with your doctor before starting the drug. Volteren is a common misspelling of Voltaren.
  • Voltren Gel
    Voltaren Gel is approved for osteoarthritis treatment. This eMedTV resource offers a brief overview of this product, including how this medication works and potential side effects. Voltren Gel is a common misspelling of Voltaren Gel.
  • Warnings and Precautions With Flurbiprofen
    Women who are in the third trimester of pregnancy or are nursing shouldn't take flurbiprofen. This eMedTV page lists more warnings and precautions with flurbiprofen, including potential side effects (such as anemia) and drug interactions.
  • Was Celebrex Taken Off the Market?
    This eMedTV resource explains that while Celebrex was not taken off the market, a similar medication was. This segment explains why, provides a brief overview of Celebrex, and offers a link to more in-depth information on this particular drug.
  • What Are NSAIDs Used For?
    This eMedTV resource explains what NSAIDs are used for, including the treatment of painful menstrual periods and the temporary relief of fever. This page also lists some off-label uses, such as treating migraines and symptoms of chronic fatigue.
  • What Are Rheumatoid Arthritis Flares?
    This segment of the eMedTV library defines the term flares as it pertains to rheumatoid arthritis. It also explains how they appear in some people with RA but not in others and why the cause of these flares is not always apparent.
  • What Are Rheumatoid Nodules?
    This page of the eMedTV library defines the term rheumatoid nodules. It lists the common locations they may be found and explains why they develop.
  • What Are the Early Symptoms of Rheumatoid Arthritis?
    Early symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis are not always readily apparent. This eMedTV Web page lists a few of the more common ones and explains why a lack of symptoms, while frustrating when making a diagnosis, is not necessarily a bad thing.
  • What Happens During A Total Knee Replacement?
    This interactive video describes in detail what happens with a total knee replacement.
  • What Happens During Total Hip Replacement?
    This video clip explains what occurs during a total hip replacement.
  • What If You Don't Have a Hip Replacement?
    This clip explains what can happen if you don't have a total hip replacement.
  • What If You Don't Have A Knee Replacement?
    This clip talks about what may happen if you decide not to get a total knee replacement.
  • What If You Don't Have Hip Replacement Surgery?
    Many people wonder what will happen if they don't have hip replacement surgery. As this eMedTV resource explains, without this surgery, you may notice that your pain gets worse. This can be especially true for people with arthritis in their hips.
  • What If You Don't Have Knee Arthroscopy (Synovectomy)?
    This video clip explains what may happen if you don't have knee arthroscopy.
  • What If You Don't Have Total Hip Replacement?
    This clip explains what can happen if you don't have a total hip replacement.
  • What Is Adalimumab Used For?
    This eMedTV article discusses how adalimumab helps relieve inflammatory conditions affecting the joints, spine, and digestive system. This page describes the conditions adalimumab is used for and also talks about off-label uses.
  • What Is Allopurinol Used For?
    Common allopurinol uses include preventing high uric acid levels in people with certain health conditions. This eMedTV Web resource takes a closer look at what allopurinol is used for, including its use in children and possible off-label uses.
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