Arthritis Articles A-Z

Romatoid Arthritis - The Day of Hip Replacement Surgery

This page contains links to eMedTV Arthritis Articles containing information on subjects from Romatoid Arthritis to The Day of Hip Replacement Surgery. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Romatoid Arthritis
    Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that causes pain and stiffness in the joints. This eMedTV page takes a brief look at this autoimmune disease and offers a link to more information. Romatoid arthritis is a common misspelling of rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Ruematoid Arthritis
    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that affects the joints. This eMedTV article takes a further look at this medical condition and describes possible treatment options. Ruematoid arthritis is a common misspelling of rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Rumatoid Arthritis
    When a person has rheumatoid arthritis, he or she has pain and stiffness in the joints. This eMedTV page discusses what this disease involves and who is at a higher risk of developing it. Rumatoid arthritis is a common misspelling of rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Rumatoid Arthritis Sympotms
    As this eMedTV page explains, rheumatoid arthritis symptoms often include a decrease in motion and swollen joints. This page also lists other possible symptoms. Rumatoid arthritis sympotms is a common misspelling of rheumatoid arthritis symptoms.
  • Rumitoid Arthritis
    This page from the eMedTV Web library explains how rheumatoid arthritis causes pain, swelling, and stiffness in the joints. This article also describes possible causes of the disease. Rumitoid arthritis is a common misspelling of rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Rumitoid Arthritus
    This eMedTV page discusses what occurs in people who have rheumatoid arthritis, a joint disease that causes pain and stiffness. This page also describes possible treatment strategies. Rumitoid arthritus is a common misspelling of rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Scar Formation Following Knee Replacement
    Because the skin is cut during total knee replacement surgery, you will have a scar. However, as this eMedTV segment explains, scar formation following knee replacement surgery is not necessarily a reflection of the results of the surgery.
  • Scars and Total Hip Replacement Surgery
    Every surgery leaves a scar, and total hip replacement surgery is no exception. However, as this eMedTV resource explains, the scar's appearance can vary, and how the scar looks does not reflect the results of the procedure.
  • See Your Doctor
    Sometimes a food allergy or sensitivity can be the source of inflammation. However, don't start cutting foods out without first talking with your healthcare provider, who can help diagnose such conditions in a more scientific manner. Unnecessary restrictions can make it difficult (and much more expensive) to consume a well-balanced diet. In addition, some food allergies or sensitivities (such as celiac disease) are much easier to diagnose before you cut the offending foods out of your diet. Experimenting with "elimination" diets can make an accurate diagnosis much more difficult.
  • Septic Artheritis
    Septic arthritis is a condition that develops when a bacterial infection occurs within a joint. This page on the eMedTV site lists risk factors and common symptoms of this condition. Septic artheritis is a common misspelling of septic arthritis.
  • Septic Arthiritis
    Septic arthritis can occur when a bacterial infection occurs within a joint. This eMedTV resource describes the effects of this condition and explains how it can be treated. Septic arthiritis is a common misspelling of septic arthritis.
  • Septic Arthritis
    Septic arthritis is an inflammatory condition caused by a bacterial infection. This eMedTV article explores the causes and symptoms of this condition and includes information about how it is diagnosed and treated.
  • Septic Arthritis Causes
    The causes of septic arthritis involve bacterial infections that develop in one or more joints. This eMedTV Web page discusses the infections that can lead to septic arthritis based on age and also lists risk factors for the condition.
  • Septic Arthritis Symptoms
    Severe joint pain, swelling in the joint, fever, and chills are all indications of septic arthritis. This eMedTV article describes the signs and symptoms of septic arthritis, and explains which joints are most likely to be affected by the condition.
  • Septic Arthritis Treatment
    As explained in this section of the eMedTV library, septic arthritis treatment typically involves a course of antibiotics. It may also involve draining fluid from the joint for analysis. Children with septic arthritis often require surgery.
  • Septic Arthritus
    Septic arthritis is a type of infectious arthritis caused by a bacterial infection. This eMedTV page explains who can be affected by this condition and describes available treatment options. Septic arthritus is a common misspelling of septic arthritis.
  • Septik Arthritis
    Septic arthritis is a condition that most often affects infants and children under age three. This eMedTV article explores the causes, symptoms, and treatments of this condition. Septik arthritis is a common misspelling of septic arthritis.
  • Side Affects of Tylenol
    Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea are side effects that may occur in people who overdose on Tylenol. This eMedTV page lists other possible Tylenol side effects. Side affects of Tylenol is a common misspelling of Tylenol side effects.
  • Side Effects of Flurbiprofen
    Some common side effects of flurbiprofen include gas, diarrhea, and nausea. This eMedTV article also lists rare side effects like anemia and asthma; and serious problems that should be reported to your doctor, including bloody nose or vomiting blood.
  • Side Effects of Piroxicam
    Common side effects of piroxicam include swelling, unexplained rash, and nausea. This page on the eMedTV Web site provides a list of several common and rare side effects of this drug, as well as serious reactions, like chest pain and liver damage.
  • Side Effects of Rituximab
    When using rituximab, you may develop nausea, chills, or infections. This selection from the eMedTV Web site provides more information on side effects of rituximab, including potentially serious problems requiring immediate medical care.
  • Side Effects of Sulindac
    This segment of the eMedTV archives lists common sulindac side effects that may occur, such as headache, dizziness, and diarrhea. Other less common side effects and serious problems that require medical attention are also included.
  • Side Effects With Diclofenac Sodium Extended-Release
    Common side effects with diclofenac sodium extended-release include gas, itching, and swelling. This eMedTV Web page also lists some of the drug's rare side effects, as well as side effects requiring emergency medical attention (like chest pain).
  • Signs of Arthritus
    Common arthritis symptoms include joint pain, swelling, or stiffness. This eMedTV resource provides a list of other possible signs or symptoms of arthritis. Signs of arthritus is a common variation and misspelling of arthritis symptoms.
  • Simponi
    Simponi is a drug approved to treat rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and other conditions. This eMedTV article explains this product in more detail, including how it works, how often it is injected, possible side effects, and more.
  • Simponi and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown if Simponi passes through breast milk in humans. This page from the eMedTV Web site discusses breastfeeding and Simponi, explaining why no research has explored this topic and discussing what the manufacturer recommends.
  • Simponi and Pregnancy
    It is generally considered safe for pregnant women to use Simponi. This selection from the eMedTV site contains more details on using this drug during pregnancy, including the FDA's official recommendation and the results of animal studies on the topic.
  • Simponi Dosage
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV Web site, Simponi is typically injected once a month. This page looks at the dosing guidelines for this medication in detail, including helpful tips on how to inject it.
  • Simponi Interactions
    Polio vaccine, Jantoven, and FluMist are just a few of the products that can react with Simponi. This eMedTV resource describes several other drugs that can interact with Simponi and explains how you can reduce your risk of problems while using it.
  • Simponi Medication Information
    Simponi is a prescription drug used to treat certain inflammatory disorders, such as ankylosing spondylitis. This eMedTV segment offers more information on Simponi, explaining the medication's dosing guidelines and possible side effects.
  • Simponi Overdose
    At this time, very little is known about what can happen if you take too much Simponi (golimumab). This eMedTV page talks about what happened when large doses were given in studies and explains the likely treatment options for a Simponi overdose.
  • Simponi Side Effects
    Some people who use Simponi experience side effects, such as high blood pressure or cold sores. This part of the eMedTV site offers a detailed list of side effects seen with this drug and discusses how they were studied and how frequently they occur.
  • Simponi Uses
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Simponi is prescribed for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and other inflammatory conditions. This article takes a closer look at what Simponi is used for and explains how it works.
  • Simponi Warnings and Precautions
    Before using Simponi, tell your doctor if you have congestive heart failure or multiple sclerosis. This eMedTV Web page discusses other warnings and precautions for this drug and explains why Simponi may not be suitable for everyone.
  • Sinvisc
    Synvisc is a treatment for osteoarthritis of the knee. This article from the eMedTV Web site describes this product in more detail, explains how it works, and lists some of its potential side effects. Sinvisc is a common misspelling of Synvisc.
  • Special Instruments (Total Hip Replacement)
    For this procedure, an artificial joint, is used to replace your hip. This video covers the special instruments that may be used for your procedure.
  • Special Instruments (Total Knee Replacement)
    This multimedia clip describes some of the special instruments that will be used during your procedure.
  • Spice Things Up
    If your stomach can handle it, spice up your diet. Turmeric, cinnamon, garlic, and ginger all have been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties. Other herbs and spices probably have similar effects against inflammation as well.
  • Substitutes for Celebrex
    Other medicines, surgery, and acupuncture are possible substitutes for Celebrex. This selection from the eMedTV site provides a complete list of alternatives to this medication, explains when a substitute may be considered, and links to more information.
  • Substitutes for Ibuprofen
    Although most people have no problems with ibuprofen, a substitute may be required in certain situations. This eMedTV segment explains when this is the case, briefly explains how this medication works, and includes a link to a list of alternatives.
  • Substitutes for Mobic
    This page from the eMedTV Web site provides a list of various substitutes for Mobic, including aspirin, ibuprofen, and salsalate. This Web article also explains when a healthcare provider may recommend an alternative to Mobic.
  • Substitutes for Naproxen
    This selection from the eMedTV Web library provides a list of various substitutes for naproxen, including aspirin, ibuprofen, and salsalate. This article also explains when a doctor may recommend an alternative to naproxen.
  • Sulindac
    Sulindac is a prescription drug that is used to treat mild to moderate pain, inflammation, or stiffness. This eMedTV page discusses specific uses for the drug, how it works, potential side effects that may occur, and available strengths.
  • Sulindac Dosing
    The recommended dose of sulindac for the relief of acute pain or gout is typically 200 mg, twice a day. This eMedTV page lists dosing guidelines for the treatment of other conditions and offers precautions to consider when taking the drug.
  • Sulindac Info
    As explained in this eMedTV article, sulindac is a drug approved to treat pain, stiffness, and other symptoms. This Web page provides some basic info on sulindac, such as important safety warnings, and includes a link to learn more.
  • Surgery to Replace a Hip
    This video clip explains what occurs during a total hip replacement.
  • Synvisc
    Synvisc is an osteoarthritis treatment that is injected directly into the knee. As this eMedTV page explains, it is used to cushion and lubricate the knee joint. It is ideal for people who have not received adequate pain relief from other treatments.
  • Synvisc Adverse Effects
    Although most people respond well to Synvisc, adverse effects are possible. This article from the eMedTV library describes the most common problems that have been reported with Synvisc and explains which side effects may require medical attention.
  • Synvisc and Breastfeeding
    It is not known whether Synvisc (hylan G-F 20) passes through breast milk. This eMedTV article further discusses whether Synvisc and breastfeeding are compatible, and explains if problems are likely to occur if the product passes through breast milk.
  • Synvisc and Pregnancy
    It is unknown whether Synvisc (hylan G-F 20) is safe for use during pregnancy. This article from the eMedTV library contains more information on Synvisc and pregnancy, and explains whether the FDA has given this product a pregnancy category rating.
  • Synvisc Dangers
    You should not take Synvisc if you are allergic to chicken products (as it is made from chicken combs). This eMedTV segment discusses other potential Synvisc dangers and explains what side effects may occur with this particular arthritis treatment.
  • Synvisc Dosage
    There is only one standard recommended dose when using Synvisc for treating osteoarthritis. As this eMedTV Web page explains, the recommended Synvisc dosage is one 2-mL injection once a week for three weeks, for a total of three injections per knee.
  • Synvisc Drug Interactions
    There are no known drug interactions with Synvisc at this time. As this article on the eMedTV Web site explains, however, there may be interactions that are not known at this time but that may be discovered at a later date.
  • Synvisc for Arthritis of the Knees
    Doctors may recommend Synvisc for arthritis of the knees in people who need help with pain relief. This eMedTV resource explains how Synvisc works to treat arthritis and describes the benefits of this particular osteoarthritis treatment.
  • Synvisc Injections
    People with arthritis of the knee may benefit from Synvisc injections, which are used to help relieve pain. This eMedTV article describes the benefits of this osteoarthritis treatment and explains how often the injections will be administered.
  • Synvisc Knee Injections
    People with arthritis of the knee who have significant pain may benefit from Synvisc knee injections. This eMedTV Web page explains how Synvisc works for arthritis pain relief and describes the benefits of this particular treatment.
  • Synvisc Medicine for Arthritis
    Synvisc is an arthritis treatment that is injected directly into the knee. As this eMedTV article explains, there is no Synvisc "medicine" for arthritis; Synvisc is classified as a "device" by the FDA and is not actually considered a medication.
  • Synvisc Shots
    People with knee arthritis who do not experience adequate pain relief from drugs may try Synvisc shots. As this eMedTV resource explains, Synvisc is a gel-like liquid that is injected directly into the knee joint to cushion and lubricate it.
  • Synvisc Side Effects
    During clinical trials, the most common side effect of Synvisc was knee pain or swelling. This eMedTV resource lists other possible side effects and explains which problems are potentially serious and require immediate medical attention.
  • Synvisc Therapy
    Synvisc is an osteoarthritis treatment approved for people with knee arthritis. As this eMedTV segment explains, Synvisc therapy consists of a series of three injections into the knee. Your doctor will give you an injection once a week for three weeks.
  • Synvisc Uses
    Synvisc is used for treating arthritis of the knee in people who have not responded well to drugs. This eMedTV article discusses these uses in more detail, describes how this osteoarthritis treatment works, and lists possible off-label uses.
  • Synvisc Warnings and Precautions
    Synvisc should not be injected into the bloodstream or anywhere else except the knee joint. This eMedTV segment lists other Synvisc warnings and precautions, including more information on how to safely use this osteoarthritis treatment.
  • Synvise
    Synvisc is an arthritis treatment specifically approved for osteoarthritis of the knee. This eMedTV segment explains how the drug is administered and describes its beneficial effects. Synvise is a common misspelling of Synvisc.
  • Synvisk
    Synvisc is an osteoarthritis treatment approved for treating arthritis of the knee. This eMedTV page describes how Synvisc works, explains who it is approved for, and lists its potential side effects. Synvisk is a common misspelling of Synvisc.
  • Synvist
    People with arthritis of the knee may experience pain relief with Synvisc. As this eMedTV Web page explains, the product is injected directly into the knee joint to provide cushioning and lubrication. Synvist is a common misspelling of Synvisc.
  • Tendon Damage (Total Knee Replacement Risks)
    This video clip explains why tendon damage can occur with this procedure and how it's handled.
  • Tendon Injury During Knee Replacement Surgery
    This eMedTV Web page discusses the likelihood of tendon injury during knee replacement surgery and how it is treated. It is possible for this injury to occur if the tendon tears away from the bone when the knee is bent during the surgery.
  • The Day of Hip Replacement Surgery
    On the day of hip replacement surgery, you will be given an EKG and an IV before entering the surgery room. This eMedTV article explains what else will happen prior to your surgery and what you can do to be prepared.
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