Arthritis Articles A-Z

Diclofenac Dangers - Drug Interactions With Nabumetone

This page contains links to eMedTV Arthritis Articles containing information on subjects from Diclofenac Dangers to Drug Interactions With Nabumetone. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Diclofenac Dangers
    Diclofenac products may not be safe for people who are allergic to aspirin or other NSAIDs. This eMedTV resource discusses other possible dangers of diclofenac use and lists some of the potentially serious side effects that may occur with this drug.
  • Diclofenac Dosage
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the recommended dose of oral diclofenac for pain relief is 50 mg three times daily or 25 mg four times a day. This article also offers dosing guidelines for the treatment of arthritis, migraines, and other conditions.
  • Diclofenac Drug Information
    Diclofenac is a prescription medicine used to treat pain, arthritis, and other conditions. In this eMedTV page, you will find more information about the drug, including details on diclofenac's other approved uses and general dosing information.
  • Diclofenac Drug Interactions
    Lithium, aspirin, and certain diuretics can interact with diclofenac. This eMedTV segment lists other medications that may interfere with diclofenac and describes the problems that may occur with these interactions.
  • Diclofenac Effects
    Diclofenac is a medication that is beneficial for treating pain, arthritis, and other conditions. In this eMedTV page, you will learn more about the effects of diclofenac and find out exactly how this medication works to reduce pain and inflammation.
  • Diclofenac for Pain
    For the treatment of pain, diclofenac is often prescribed by healthcare providers. This eMedTV resource describes how diclofenac works for relieving pain and inflammation, and explains how the drug can be used for "off-label" purposes.
  • Diclofenac Medication Information
    Diclofenac is approved for relieving pain and treating conditions such as migraines or arthritis. This eMedTV segment provides more information about the prescription medication, including details on what else diclofenac is used for and how it works.
  • Diclofenac Overdose
    An overdose with diclofenac may lead to upper chest pain, lethargy, or high blood pressure. This eMedTV resource lists other possible overdose symptoms and explains what steps your doctor may take to treat an oral overdose of this drug.
  • Diclofenac Problems
    It is possible to develop certain problems with diclofenac, although most people tolerate the drug well. This eMedTV segment lists common side effects of diclofenac and also describes some of the more serious problems that may occur with the medicine.
  • Diclofenac Risks
    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as diclofenac may cause liver damage in some people. This eMedTV segment explores other potential risks of diclofenac and also describes some of the more common (and often mild) side effects of the drug.
  • Diclofenac Side Effects
    Common side effects of diclofenac oral products include vomiting, dizziness, and gas. This eMedTV segment lists other possible side effects, including side effects that may occur with other products (such as skin patches or eye drops).
  • Diclofenac Sodium Extended-Release
    Diclofenac sodium extended-release is often used for symptoms of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. This eMedTV segment discusses the drug's effects, dosing information, overdose symptoms, available strengths, and more.
  • Diclofenac Sodium Extended-Release Info
    Diclofenac sodium extended-release is a prescription drug used to treat arthritis symptoms. This eMedTV resource provides some basic drug information on diclofenac sodium extended-release, including side effects, safety warnings, and how to take it.
  • Diclofenac Tablets
    Diclofenac is available in many different forms (capsules, skin patches, gel, tablets, and eye drops). This eMedTV Web page lists the various strengths that are available for the tablets and extended-release tablets and offers tips for using diclofenac.
  • Diclofenac Warnings and Precautions
    You should not use diclofenac if you recently had open heart surgery. This eMedTV page offers more information on who should not use this drug. Warnings and precautions on what side effects or complications may occur with diclofenac are also included.
  • Diclofenal
    The prescription drug diclofenac is commonly used to relieve pain. This eMedTV article lists other uses of the medicine and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before starting treatment. Diclofenal is a common misspelling of diclofenac.
  • Diclofenec
    Many doctors may prescribe diclofenac for treating pain, arthritis, migraines, and other conditions. This eMedTV segment explains how the drug works and describes its various forms. Diclofenec is a common misspelling of diclofenac.
  • Diclofenic
    Diclofenac is a pain reliever that belongs to a class of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This eMedTV page discusses the uses of this medication in more detail and explains how it works. Diclofenic is a common misspelling of diclofenac.
  • Diclofinac
    Diclofenac products can be used to treat pain, migraines, and arthritis. This eMedTV resource describes the various forms of this medicine and lists some of the side effects that may occur. Diclofinac is a common misspelling of diclofenac.
  • Diclophenac
    Diclofenac is used to treat migraines, arthritis, and various other conditions. This eMedTV page explains what else the medicine is used for, describes how it works, and lists some possible side effects. Diclophenac is a common misspelling of diclofenac.
  • Diclovenac
    Part of a class of drugs called NSAIDs, diclofenac is used to treat pain, arthritis, and migraines. This eMedTV page explains what forms this drug comes in and lists some of its potential side effects. Diclovenac is a common misspelling of diclofenac.
  • Diet for Osteoarthritis
    There is no "diet for osteoarthritis" that can help cure or slow down the progression of the disease. But as this eMedTV page explains, people with osteoarthritis should control their weight and eat heart-healthy foods, such as fruits and vegetables.
  • Diklofenak
    Diclofenac is a pain medication that can also be used to treat arthritis and migraine headaches. This eMedTV page describes various diclofenac products and lists some possible side effects of the drug. Diklofenak is a common misspelling of diclofenac.
  • Do You Have Gout?
    Sudden pain, inflammation, and redness in a joint may mean you have gout. However, as this eMedTV page explains, gout is characterized by specific symptoms. This page lists a few signs of gout and includes a link to more information on this subject.
  • Does Chondroitin Work?
    Many people may wonder, "Does chondroitin work?" This selection from the eMedTV Web site explores the results of studies done on the effectiveness of chondroitin for treating arthritis and also discusses other possible uses for the dietary supplement.
  • Does Cod Liver Oil Work?
    This eMedTV segment addresses the question, "Does cod liver oil work?" This article describes the research that has been done on the effectiveness of cod liver oil for treating several medical conditions, such as high triglycerides and arthritis.
  • Does Diet Play a Role in Rheumatoid Arthritis?
    Dietary changes may help alleviate symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis; however, as this eMedTV article explains, it is not entirely clear just how much of a role these changes can play. In any case, eating a healthier diet may improve your overall health.
  • Does Gastric Bypass Surgery Affect Rheumatoid Arthritis?
    There is no clear information on how a gastric bypass surgery will affect someone with rheumatoid arthritis. This eMedTV resource describes the possible benefits such surgery might offer, but also stresses discussing the matter with all of your doctors.
  • Does Glucosamine Work?
    Many people may wonder, "Does glucosamine work?" This section of the eMedTV library explores the effectiveness of glucosamine for treating arthritis and also discusses other possible uses for the dietary supplement.
  • Dolabid
    Dolobid is a drug used to treat inflammation and stiffness caused by osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. This eMedTV page explains how Dolobid works and lists potential side effects of the medication. Dolabid is a common misspelling of Dolobid.
  • Dolobid
    Dolobid, which is available by prescription, relieves pain, inflammation, and stiffness caused by arthritis. This eMedTV Web page provides a detailed look at the drug, including how it works, side effects, dosing information, and strengths.
  • Dolobid and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, Dolobid shouldn't be taken during the third trimester of pregnancy, as it could harm the fetus or complicate labor and delivery. This page advises you to tell your doctor if you're taking Dolobid and pregnancy occurs.
  • Dolobid and Weight Gain
    If you're taking Dolobid and weight gain occurs over time, lifestyle changes in diet and exercise may help. This eMedTV page also explains that rapid weight gain and swelling can signify congestive heart failure and should be reported to your doctor.
  • Dolobid Dosage
    This eMedTV page provides the starting Dolobid dosage for osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis and also gives tips on taking the drug. For example, the starting dose for mild to moderate pain is 1000 mg, followed by 500 mg every 12 hours.
  • Dolobid Drug Interactions
    Advil, Aleve, and Neoral are a few drugs that can potentially interact with Dolobid. As this eMedTV page explains, drug interactions can alter the levels of medication in the blood and make some drugs less effective, among other things.
  • Dolobid Medicine
    Though not a cure, Dolobid can help reduce pain due to rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. This eMedTV Web page offers some details on this pain medicine, explaining how Dolobid works and listing important dosing guidelines.
  • Dolobid Precautions and Warnings
    Dolobid may cause serious side effects, such as liver damage. This eMedTV segment talks about the warnings and precautions with Dolobid, including things to tell your doctor before taking it, as well as people who shouldn't take the drug at all.
  • Dolobid Side Effects
    Headache, diarrhea, and nausea are common side effects of Dolobid. This eMedTV page also lists rare side effects, like anemia, and serious side effects that could signify a heart attack in some people taking the drug, such as chest pain.
  • Dolobid Uses
    This eMedTV page lists common Dolobid uses, such as relieving symptoms of osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, as well as pain due to muscle strain. This page also covers uses for the drug in children and off-label uses, like treating migraines.
  • Dosing With Diclofenac Sodium Extended-Release
    As this eMedTV page explains, it is recommended that those with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis take 100 mg of diclofenac sodium extended-release per day. This page also offers general tips on dosing with diclofenac sodium extended-release.
  • Dosing With Etodolac
    For relieving acute pain, etodolac dosing generally starts at 200 mg to 400 mg every six to eight hours. This eMedTV page also contains dosing recommendations for treating arthritis symptoms and offers tips and precautions when taking the drug.
  • Dosing With Indomethacin
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the starting dosage of indomethacin for arthritis symptoms is 25 mg two or three times daily. This article describes dosing guidelines for several conditions and discusses when and how to best take the medication.
  • Dosing With Nabumetone
    For osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, the starting nabumetone dosage is 1000 mg daily. As this eMedTV page explains, this dosage can be taken once daily or divided into a twice-daily dose. This page gives several other helpful dosing guidelines.
  • Dosing With Piroxicam
    As this eMedTV page explains, for osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, the starting piroxicam dosage is 20 mg once daily or 10 mg twice daily. This page suggests talking with your doctor if you have questions about how and when to take piroxicam.
  • Drug Interactions With Adalimumab
    This portion of the eMedTV archives explores potential drug interactions with adalimumab and other medications, such as live vaccines, anakinra, and etanercept. This article also describes the problems that can occur with these interactions.
  • Drug Interactions With Allopurinol
    ACE inhibitors and diuretics may potentially cause drug interactions with allopurinol. As this eMedTV page explains, these interactions can potentially lead to serious complications. This page also lists other drugs that may interact with allopurinol.
  • Drug Interactions With Colchicine
    As this eMedTV page explains, colchicine can interact with a number of drugs, including digoxin and statins. This page takes a closer look at these and other interactions, including information on potentially life-threatening problems that can occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Diclofenac Sodium Extended-Release
    As this eMedTV page explains, diclofenac sodium extended-release can interact with drugs such as diuretics, ACE inhibitors, and herbal supplements. These interactions can raise the risk of kidney damage, among other things.
  • Drug Interactions With Etodolac
    This eMedTV resource provides a list of medicines that may cause drug interactions with etodolac, including diuretics, warfarin, and corticosteroids. As the article explains, these interactions may increase the risk for kidney damage and bleeding.
  • Drug Interactions With Flurbiprofen
    This eMedTV Web article lists medicines that may potentially cause drug interactions with flurbiprofen (like other NSAIDs and diuretics). This article also explains the possible effects of these interactions.
  • Drug Interactions With Indomethacin
    This eMedTV resource talks about medications that may interact with indomethacin, including aspirin, lithium, ibuprofen, and ramipril. This article also explains what can happen when these interactions occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Nabumetone
    Nabumetone can potentially interact with warfarin, aspirin, Advil, and other drugs. This eMedTV page explains how drug interactions with nabumetone can change the way your body metabolizes the drugs and raise the levels of some drugs in your blood.
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