Arthritis Articles A-Z

Coffee and Tea - Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Factors? - Diclofenac and Pregnancy

This page contains links to eMedTV Arthritis Articles containing information on subjects from Coffee and Tea - Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Factors? to Diclofenac and Pregnancy. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Coffee and Tea - Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Factors?
    Some people may wonder if coffee and tea are risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis. This eMedTV Web page explains that there is little evidence of a connection between women consuming these beverages and developing rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Colchasine
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, colchicine is used to treat several conditions, such as gout and familial Mediterranean fever. This page also covers some general precautions with the drug. Colchasine is a common misspelling of colchicine.
  • Colchesine
    Colchicine is a medicine used to reduce inflammation associated with gout attacks. This eMedTV article discusses colchicine in more detail, including dosing information and possible side effects. Colchesine is a common misspelling of colchicine.
  • Colchicine
    Available by prescription, colchicine is used to treat gout flares and prevent gout attacks. This eMedTV Web page offers an overview of this medication, with information on possible side effects, general dosing guidelines, and safety warnings.
  • Colchicine 0.6 mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV Web article explains, several factors will affect your colchicine dosage, such as your age and kidney function. There is only one strength available for colchicine tablets (0.6 mg), and this medication is usually taken once or twice daily.
  • Colchicine and Breastfeeding
    Colchicine does pass through breast milk. This selection from the eMedTV Web site takes an in-depth look at breastfeeding and colchicine, discussing what the manufacturer recommends and explaining why women should use this drug with caution while nursing.
  • Colchicine and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe for pregnant women to use colchicine. This eMedTV Web resource contains more details on the topic, including the FDA's official recommendation on the safety of using this medication during pregnancy and the results of animal studies.
  • Colchicine Dosage
    The recommended dose of colchicine to prevent gout attacks is one tablet once or twice daily. This eMedTV page discusses dosing guidelines in more detail, including information on dosage amounts for treating gout attacks and familial Mediterranean fever.
  • Colchicine Drug Information
    This eMedTV Web segment provides some basic drug information on colchicine, a prescription medicine used to treat and prevent gout attacks. This article describes how it works, other uses, and why it may not be the best choice for everyone.
  • Colchicine Gout Treatment
    As explained in this article from the eMedTV Web library, colchicine can help prevent and treat gout attacks. This page briefly discusses how colchicine works for gout treatment and prevention, and provides a link to more information on this drug.
  • Colchicine Medication Information
    Colchicine is a prescription drug used to treat and prevent gout attacks. This eMedTV Web page provides more information on colchicine, explaining the medication's dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and general safety precautions.
  • Colchicine Oral
    As this eMedTV Web page discusses, oral colchicine tablets can help treat and prevent gout attacks. This article describes what this medication is used for, possible side effects, and general dosing guidelines. A link to more information is also included.
  • Colchicine Overdose
    Vomiting, multi-organ failure, and even death may occur due to a colchicine overdose. This eMedTV Web resource describes other possible overdose symptoms and explains the treatment options that are available for this type of overdose.
  • Colchicine Risks
    Talk to your healthcare provider before taking colchicine if you have liver or kidney disease. This eMedTV segment takes a brief look at the risks associated with colchicine, explaining some of the drug's safety precautions and potential side effects.
  • Colchicine Side Effects
    When using colchicine, you may develop symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. This eMedTV Web page provides more information on the side effects of colchicine, including potentially serious problems requiring immediate medical care.
  • Colchicine Uses
    As explained in this eMedTV article, colchicine is used for treating gout and familial Mediterranean fever. This page further describes possible uses of this prescription medication, including possible off-label uses and whether it's safe for children.
  • Colchisine
    Colchicine is a medicine prescribed to treat and prevent gout attacks. This eMedTV Web resource takes a brief look at colchicine, including its uses, how it works, and possible side effects. Colchisine is a common misspelling of colchicine.
  • Common Problems in the Knees
    ACL injuries, loose bodies inside the knee, and diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis are some of the problems that can occur in the knee. This video discusses several common knee problems.
  • Complications From Total Hip Replacement
    As this eMedTV page explains, people undergoing total hip replacement are at risk for certain complications from the procedure. This article lists some of these specific problems and includes a link to more information.
  • Condroitin
    Chondroitin is a supplement that is claimed to help treat osteoarthritis, among other conditions. This eMedTV page explores this product, including possible side effects and whether it is effective. Condroitin is a common misspelling of chondroitin.
  • Coping With Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis
    This eMedTV resource offers tips for parents of children dealing with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, such as encouraging the child to exercise during symptom-free periods. This article also explains how the child's teacher can lend support.
  • CPM Machine (Total Knee Replacement)
    This video clip describes how a CPM machine works and explains what it is used for.
  • Cracking Joints
    Some studies show that cracking joints doesn't cause any harm. But as this eMedTV article explains, you should see a healthcare provider if the cracking causes pain. This page describes in detail what makes joints pop or crack.
  • Cure for Gout
    While you may find products on the Internet that claim to cure gout, there is currently no cure. But as this eMedTV page explains, you can take steps to help prevent gout (like maintaining a healthy weight), as well as keep it under control.
  • Cut It Out
    Sometimes what you don't eat is more important than what you do eat. Avoiding pro-inflammatory foods is an important component in the fight against inflammation. Some of the worst offenders are saturated fats, trans-fats, and sugar. Most highly processed foods are also highly inflammatory, thanks to the high content of sugar or "bad" fats. So try exchanging that box of sugary breakfast cereal for a bowl of oatmeal to help reduce inflammation.
  • Dangers of Arthrotec
    Kidney damage, anemia, and strokes are some of the potential dangers with Arthrotec. This eMedTV segment lists other possible problems that may occur with this drug, and explains why it should be taken only for the shortest amount of time possible.
  • Dangers of Colchicine
    You may not be able to use colchicine if you have certain conditions (such as kidney or liver problems). This eMedTV segment takes a closer look at the potential dangers of colchicine and explains what you should be aware of before starting treatment.
  • Dapro
    Daypro is commonly prescribed for people with certain forms of arthritis. This eMedTV resource explains how the drug works, how it is taken, and its various uses. A link to more information is also included. Dapro is a common misspelling of Daypro.
  • Daypro
    Daypro is a drug often prescribed to treat pain and inflammation associated with various forms of arthritis. This eMedTV Web page offers more details on the medication, including its specific uses, effects, and general dosing information.
  • Daypro and Pregnancy
    Certain complications may occur with the use of Daypro, and pregnancy risks are a possibility. This page on the eMedTV site discusses the potential dangers of taking this drug during pregnancy and explains when a doctor may prescribe the medicine.
  • Daypro and Weight Gain
    If you are taking Daypro and weight gain occurs, you can try a number of dieting or exercise tips. This eMedTV page offers tips to help with weight gain, such as eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, and limiting your alcohol intake.
  • Daypro Dosage
    The recommended dose of Daypro for treating pain and inflammation seen with osteoarthritis is 1200 mg a day. This eMedTV resource also discusses dosing for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and offers tips and precautions for taking the drug.
  • Daypro Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV article discusses potential Daypro drug interactions that may occur when combined with aspirin, warfarin, or diuretics, for example. These interactions may decrease the drugs' effectiveness or cause certain side effects, such as bleeding.
  • Daypro Information
    Are you looking for information on Daypro? This eMedTV Web page is a good place to start. It explains how this drug works to treat certain kinds of arthritis, possible side effects, and what to discuss with the healthcare provider prescribing it.
  • Daypro Precautions and Warnings
    Daypro may potentially cause cardiovascular events, such as a heart attack or stroke. This eMedTV page offers other Daypro precautions and warnings, including other possible side effects that may develop and a list of who should not take the drug.
  • Daypro Side Effects
    This eMedTV segment contains a list of common Daypro side effects that may occur, including gas, heartburn, or swelling. Less common side effects, as well as problems that should be reported to a healthcare provider, are also listed on this page.
  • Declofenac
    People with migraines or arthritis may benefit from diclofenac products. This eMedTV article further explains what the drug is used for and describes how it works to treat pain or inflammation. Declofenac is a common misspelling of diclofenac.
  • Details About Hip Arthritis
    This video describes what causes hip arthritis.
  • Details About Knee Arthritis
    This video explains what happens when your knee wears out.
  • Dexamehtasone
    If you have certain medical conditions, dexamethasone may not be right for you. This eMedTV page lists important information for your doctor in this regard and includes a link to a detailed article. Dexamehtasone is a common misspelling of dexamethasone.
  • Dexamethason
    The steroid dexamethasone is used to treat a wide range of conditions, from allergies to cancer. This eMedTV segment provides a brief look at this medication, with a link to more detailed information. Dexamethason is a common misspelling of dexamethasone.
  • Dexamethasone
    This segment of the eMedTV archives takes a detailed look at dexamethasone, a drug found in many different products, ranging from tablets to intravitreal implants. This page discusses the medicine's uses, side effects, dosing, and more.
  • Dexamethasone and Breastfeeding
    While the manufacturers recommend that women avoid dexamethasone when breastfeeding, this eMedTV article explains that some sources believe that the drug is safe, especially if the ear or eye drops are used. You should discuss the issue with your doctor.
  • Dexamethasone and Cancer
    Many conditions, such as asthma, Crohn's disease, and cancer can be treated with dexamethasone. This page of the eMedTV site provides a brief overview of what this drug is used for, with specific information on using it to treat cancer.
  • Dexamethasone and Diabetes
    You may need to take certain precautions if you have diabetes and are taking dexamethasone. This eMedTV Web page describes these safety concerns and includes a link to other important warnings and precautions to keep in mind during treatment.
  • Dexamethasone and Pregnancy
    In general, women who are pregnant should avoid dexamethasone. This selection from the eMedTV archives explains the effects this drug had on fetuses in animal studies and describes when its use may still be considered during pregnancy.
  • Dexamethasone Dosage
    As this eMedTV article explains, dexamethasone dosing is highly individual and will depend on the particular product that is being used and, for children, on weight, among other things. This page provides general dosing guidelines for the various forms.
  • Dexamethasone Drug Information
    This segment of the eMedTV archives provides some important information on dexamethasone, a drug used to treat many different conditions. This page briefly explores the various forms of dexamethasone and what to discuss with the doctor prescribing it.
  • Dexamethasone Drug Interactions
    This page from the eMedTV library provides an extensive list of the drugs that can interact with dexamethasone, which includes antacids, NSAIDs, and estrogens. It explains the problems that can occur as a result and how they may be avoided.
  • Dexamethasone for Nausea
    This eMedTV article explains that you can treat vomiting and nausea with dexamethasone, although these are "off-label" uses for this drug. This segment also lists a few of the approved uses for dexamethasone and includes a link to more information.
  • Dexamethasone High Blood Pressure
    One of the possible side effects of dexamethasone is high blood pressure. This selection from the eMedTV archives briefly discusses a few other adverse reactions to this steroid drug with information on how they might be avoided.
  • Dexamethasone Medication Information
    This article on the eMedTV site provides some basic information on dexamethasone, a medication used to treat a wide variety of conditions. This page explains how this drug works and what to tell the doctor prescribing it, with a link to more information.
  • Dexamethasone Ophthalmic Solution
    Just one of the many forms of dexamethasone is the 1% ophthalmic solution. This page of the eMedTV site discusses the different ways this medication may be administered, as well as the conditions it can treat. A link to more information is also included.
  • Dexamethasone Overdose
    Possible signs of a dexamethasone overdose include mood changes, irregular heartbeat, and glaucoma. This eMedTV resource describes other possible signs of an overdose, the contributing factors that determine its severity, and treatment options.
  • Dexamethasone Precautions and Warnings
    People with kidney disease, hypertension, or other conditions should use caution when taking dexamethasone. This eMedTV segment provides important dexamethasone precautions and warnings to be aware of to ensure safe, effective treatment.
  • Dexamethasone Side Effects
    The particular dexamethasone side effects a person experiences can largely depend on the form being used. This eMedTV resource lists several commonly expected reactions to this drug as well as potentially serious ones that require medical care.
  • Dexamethasone Tablets 0.5 Mg
    The tablet form of dexamethasone is available in 0.5 mg, 1 mg, and other strengths. This eMedTV selection lists the available strengths of dexamethasone tablets and also briefly discusses conditions the drug can treat and factors that affect dosing.
  • Dexamethasone Weight Gain
    When taking dexamethasone, weight gain (especially if unexplained) may be a sign of a more serious problem. This eMedTV resource discusses this topic in more detail, explaining why weight gain may occur with this medicine and how it might be avoided.
  • Dexamethesone
    Dexamethasone is a medication used in the treatment of many different conditions. This page of the eMedTV site lists a few of these conditions and discusses some possible side effects. Dexamethesone is a common misspelling of dexamethasone.
  • Dexamethosone
    This segment of the eMedTV archives provides a brief overview of dexamethasone, a steroid used to treat many different conditions. This page also includes a link to more in-depth information. Dexamethosone is a common misspelling of dexamethasone.
  • Dexamethson
    If dexamethasone is taken for longer than a few weeks, it may cause problems. This segment of the eMedTV Web site explains why and offers a brief overview of this prescription drug. Dexamethson is a common misspelling of dexamethasone.
  • Dexamethsone
    Dexamethasone is a type of glucocorticoid used to treat several different conditions. This eMedTV Web page lists several of them and includes a link to a full-length article on the medication. Dexamethsone is a common misspelling of dexamethasone.
  • Dexamthasone
    Prior to taking dexamethasone, discuss your complete medical history with your healthcare provider. This eMedTV segment explains why and lists some of the conditions this drug can treat. Dexamthasone is a common misspelling of dexamethasone.
  • Dexemethasone
    As a steroid, dexamethasone should only be used on a short-term basis. This eMedTV page explains why and lists some of the conditions that may preclude you from taking this prescription drug. Dexemethasone is a common misspelling of dexamethasone.
  • Dextramethasone
    Several different medical conditions can be treated with dexamethasone. This eMedTV resource lists a few of them and describes some of the possible side effects seen with this steroid product. Dextramethasone is a common misspelling of dexamethasone.
  • Diabetes and Total Hip Replacement
    If you have diabetes, your blood sugar levels may be abnormal, and surgery can make these symptoms worse. This eMedTV article talks about diabetes and total hip replacement surgery. This page also covers how an infection may be treated.
  • Diabetics and Knee Replacement Surgery
    People with diabetes are more likely to have complications, such as infections, following surgeries. This eMedTV page discusses diabetics and knee replacement surgery, symptoms of abnormal blood sugar levels, and how to minimize complications.
  • Diabetics and Leaving the Hospital (Total Hip)
    This video clip features information for diabetic patients who are leaving the hospital.
  • Diagnosing Ankylosing Spondylitis
    Certain blood tests can help rule out other conditions when diagnosing ankylosing spondylitis. This page of the eMedTV archives offers a step-by-step look at how doctors diagnose this condition and details about tests that they may recommend.
  • Diagnosing Arthritis
    This page on the eMedTV site explains that there is no one test for diagnosing arthritis. In order to make a diagnosis, a healthcare provider will take the patient's medical history, perform a physical exam, and recommend certain tests (such as x-rays).
  • Diagnosing Infectious Arthritis
    There is no single test that can confirm a diagnosis of infectious arthritis. As explained in this eMedTV resource, however, imaging tests, synovial fluid testing, and other tests can be helpful for doctors when considering this condition.
  • Diagnosing Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis
    This eMedTV Web page describes the steps involved in diagnosing juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, which may include certain blood tests, a physical exam, and x-rays. This article also explains why the disease can be so difficult to diagnose.
  • Diagnosing Osteoarthritis
    A combination of methods and tests are involved when diagnosing osteoarthritis; there is no single test. This eMedTV page provides an in-depth look at the process doctors use when diagnosing this condition, such as a physical exam and x-rays.
  • Diagnosing Rheumatoid Arthritis
    This eMedTV page lists some of the tools that healthcare providers use to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis, such as a medical history, laboratory tests, and x-rays. This article also looks at why the disease is difficult to diagnose in its early stages.
  • Diagnosing Septic Arthritis
    A review of a person's medical history is usually the first step when diagnosing septic arthritis. This eMedTV segment outlines the steps involved in making a definitive diagnosis, which also may include a physical exam and synovial fluid testing.
  • Diclfenac
    People experiencing pain or who have arthritis may benefit from the prescription drug diclofenac. As this eMedTV Web page explains, diclofenac products can be used to reduce pain and inflammation. Diclfenac is a common misspelling of diclofenac.
  • Diclofemac
    Diclofenac is a pain medication also approved to treat arthritis, migraines, and actinic keratosis. This eMedTV resource describes various diclofenac products and offers general warnings for the drug. Diclofemac is a common misspelling of diclofenac.
  • Diclofen
    Diclofenac is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug used to treat arthritis and other conditions. This eMedTV Web page covers other uses and explains how the medicine works to reduce pain and inflammation. Diclofen is a common misspelling of diclofenac.
  • Diclofena
    The prescription pain reliever diclofenac can also be used to treat arthritis and migraines. This eMedTV page describes diclofenac products in more detail and lists potential side effects of this drug. Diclofena is a common misspelling of diclofenac.
  • Diclofenac
    Diclofenac is a prescription medication licensed to treat migraines, pain, arthritis, and actinic keratosis. This eMedTV article covers the medicine's uses in more detail, explains how it works, and describes the various forms that this drug comes in.
  • Diclofenac 100 mg
    As this eMedTV segment explains, for relieving osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis symptoms, your healthcare provider may recommend 100 mg of diclofenac once a day. This article briefly explains how dosing works for this medication.
  • Diclofenac 75 mg
    People being treated for pain often end up taking 75 mg of diclofenac (25 mg four times daily). This eMedTV article explores other approved diclofenac uses and explains how dosing works for the treatment of these other conditions.
  • Diclofenac and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown whether diclofenac is safe for women who are nursing. This eMedTV resource offers a more in-depth look at breastfeeding and diclofenac, including information on what problems may occur if the drug passes through breast milk.
  • Diclofenac and Pregnancy
    At this time, the full risks of using diclofenac are unknown for women who are expecting. This page from the eMedTV site provides more information about pregnancy and diclofenac, and explains what problems may occur if a pregnant woman uses this drug.
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