Arthritis Articles A-Z

Drug Interactions With Piroxicam - Generic Naproxen Sodium

This page contains links to eMedTV Arthritis Articles containing information on subjects from Drug Interactions With Piroxicam to Generic Naproxen Sodium. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Drug Interactions With Piroxicam
    Drugs that can potentially interact with piroxicam include warfarin and Trexall. This eMedTV Web page explores drug interactions with piroxicam, which can raise your risk of bleeding and reduce the effectiveness of ACE inhibitors and diuretics.
  • Drug Interactions With Rituximab
    As this eMedTV page explains, rituximab can interact with a number of medicines, including cisplatin and live vaccines. This page discusses these and other drug interactions with rituximab, including information on the problems that can occur as a result.
  • Drug Interactions With Sulindac
    This eMedTV resource contains a list of medicines that may cause drug interactions with sulindac, including aspirin, beta blockers, and diuretics. These interactions may lead to decreased effectiveness of the drugs and cause severe side effects.
  • Duexis
    Available by prescription only, Duexis is a medicine used to treat osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. This eMedTV resource gives a detailed overview of this medicine, including other approved uses, dosing tips, and possible side effects.
  • Duexis and Breastfeeding
    Duexis (ibuprofen/famotidine) does pass through human breast milk in low amounts. This eMedTV Web page describes whether taking Duexis while breastfeeding would cause problems in a nursing infant and discusses the manufacturer's recommendations.
  • Duexis and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV article explains, Duexis (ibuprofen/famotidine) may cause problems if it is taken during pregnancy. This page describes some of the complications this medicine may cause and why it should typically be avoided during late pregnancy.
  • Duexis Dosage
    Taking one tablet three times daily is the standard dose for anyone using Duexis. This eMedTV resource further examines specific dosing guidelines, including some helpful tips on when and how to take this prescription medicine.
  • Duexis Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV segment explains that drug interactions may occur if Duexis is used with certain products, such as diuretics or blood pressure medicines. This article lists other medications that may cause problems and explains how to reduce your risk.
  • Duexis Medication Information
    This eMedTV Web page provides information on Duexis, a prescription medication used to treat osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. This article gives a brief overview of how this drug works and dosing tips. A link to more details is also included.
  • Duexis Overdose
    This eMedTV segment explains that if you overdose on Duexis (ibuprofen/famotidine), it can cause problems like seizures or vomiting. This page describes other possible symptoms to look out for and lists possible treatment options that are available.
  • Duexis Side Effects
    Clinical studies suggest that common Duexis side effects include constipation, nausea, and headaches. This eMedTV segment provides a detailed list of other possible reactions, including potentially serious problems that need medical treatment.
  • Duexis Uses
    If you have rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis, your doctor may prescribe Duexis. This eMedTV page further describes what Duexis is used for, including approved and unapproved uses. Details on how this combination medicine works are also included.
  • Duexis Warnings and Precautions
    You should not take Duexis if you are allergic to aspirin or in the late stages of pregnancy. This eMedTV Web selection outlines important precautions and safety warnings for Duexis, including details on potentially serious complications that may occur.
  • Eat the Rainbow
    Don't love fish? Don't despair; colorful fruits and veggies are high in antioxidants, substances that reduce the "oxidative stress" due to inflammation. In general, the brighter the fruit or veggie, the higher the antioxidant content, although this is not always the case. Berries in particular are well known for their antioxidant properties. Almost any type of berry will do; no need to spend extra money on the latest and greatest "super berry."
  • Effects of Celebrex
    Celebrex helps reduce pain and inflammation within the body. This portion of the eMedTV site takes a closer look at Celebrex and its effects, explaining how it works to relieve pain and why it's important not to take more than necessary.
  • Effects of Enbrel
    This selection from the eMedTV archives explains the effects of Enbrel on the body and why this makes it useful for conditions ranging from rheumatoid arthritis to plaque psoriasis. It also offers a couple of safety precautions with regard to dosing.
  • Effects of Ibuprofen
    This segment from the eMedTV library explains that it generally takes about an hour to feel ibuprofen's effects on pain. This selection also explains how this drug works, factors that affect a person's dose, and when to consult a doctor.
  • Effects of Long-Term Use of Dexamethasone
    As this eMedTV page explains, long-term use of dexamethasone can cause serious side effects. This segment discusses this topic in detail, describing the problems that can occur if this drug is taken for longer than a few weeks, with a link to learn more.
  • Effects of Mobic
    By blocking certain hormones in the body, Mobic helps reduce stiffness, swelling, and pain. This eMedTV Web resource talks about Mobic's effects in the body, explaining how it works and providing a link to more detailed information on this drug.
  • Effects of Naproxen
    By blocking prostaglandins, naproxen helps reduce fever, swelling, and pain. This eMedTV Web resource talks about naproxen's effects in the body, explaining how it works and providing a link to more detailed information on this drug.
  • Effects of Remicade
    This eMedTV page explains that Remicade blocks the activity of TNF-alpha, a chemical that is often elevated in people with certain conditions. This article talks about Remicade's effects in the body and provides a link to more information on this drug.
  • Effects of Rheumatoid Arthritis
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, rheumatoid arthritis can result in effects such as severe bone and joint damage in some people. This article discusses the topic in detail and explains why it's difficult to predict how the disease will affect someone.
  • Effects of Tylenol
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Tylenol has many effects in the body, including reducing fevers and relieving minor aches and pains. This article gives a brief overview of the drug and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Enbral
    Enbrel is a prescription medicine that treats inflammatory conditions of the joints and skin. This eMedTV page explains how Enbrel works, describes when to take the injection, and lists some side effects. Enbral is a common misspelling of Enbrel.
  • Enbrel
    Enbrel is a prescription drug that treats several inflammatory conditions that affect the joints and skin. This eMedTV article explains how Enbrel relieves the symptoms of these conditions, lists side effects, and covers general dosing guidelines.
  • Enbrel (Etanercept) Drug Information
    This page of the eMedTV site provides some important information on Enbrel (etanercept), a drug used to treat several different kinds of arthritis. This page briefly explains how this product works, when and how to take it, and what to tell your doctor.
  • Enbrel 50 Mg
    This eMedTV page explains that in adults, the usual dose of Enbrel is 50 mg a week, although the exact amount depends on certain factors, such as the condition being treated. This page briefly describes Enbrel dosing, with a link to more information.
  • Enbrel and Children
    This eMedTV page explains that although both adults and children can use Enbrel, it is only used for one specific condition in the younger age group. This page tells what this condition is, explains how the drug works, and links to more information.
  • Enbrel and Depression
    This eMedTV segment explores Enbrel and depression, explaining that this is a possible side effect of the medication. This page also outlines the potential symptoms of depression and explains what to do if you notice any of these signs.
  • Enbrel and Heart Attacks
    Heart attacks appear to be a potential side effect of Enbrel. This eMedTV resource explores the connection between Enbrel and heart attacks, describing how heart or blood vessel problems occur in less than 1.5 percent of people taking the drug.
  • Enbrel and Pregnancy
    It is generally considered safe for pregnant women to take Enbrel. This eMedTV resource explores this issue in detail, explaining why the FDA categorizes this product as a pregnancy Category B medicine based on the results of in animal studies.
  • Enbrel Dangers
    Although it is usually a safe, well-tolerated drug, Enbrel can cause dangerous side effects in some people. This eMedTV resource takes a brief look at this topic, with information on common side effects, safety concerns, and a link to learn more.
  • Enbrel Dosage
    As this eMedTV article explains, the recommended dosage of Enbrel will vary depending on several factors, such as your age and what medical condition you have. This page also highlights some tips for when and how to take the Enbrel injections.
  • Enbrel Drug Class
    This article from the eMedTV Web site describes the drug class that Enbrel belongs to, how this medication works, and conditions it can treat. This page also explains the benefits Enbrel provides and links to more information on its various uses.
  • Enbrel Drug Interactions
    As this eMedTV segment describes, Enbrel can potentially interact with other medicines, such as live vaccines, anakinra, and abatacept. This page explains how these drug interactions with Enbrel can cause problems, such as infections or tumors.
  • Enbrel for Psoriasis
    Psoriatic arthritis is a common complication of psoriasis, which Enbrel is often used to treat. This eMedTV segment explains how the drug works for people with this type of arthritis, when and how to take it, and its benefits.
  • Enbrel Indications
    This segment of the eMedTV library provides a brief overview of the approved uses (also called indications) for Enbrel. It explains conditions the drug is licensed to treat, describes how it works, and includes a link to more information on this subject.
  • Enbrel Injection
    Available as an injection, Enbrel is given once or twice a week, depending on various factors, which this eMedTV segment explains. Dosing for one type of arthritis is described, and a few helpful tips are provided, with a link to more information.
  • Enbrel Medication for Rheumatoid Arthritis
    People with rheumatoid arthritis may be given the medication Enbrel. This segment of the eMedTV library provides a brief overview of this drug, with information on other conditions it can treat, how soon it starts working, and possible side effects.
  • Enbrel Medication Information
    This eMedTV page provides important information on Enbrel, a medication used to treat a few different types of arthritis. This includes what to tell the doctor prescribing it, as well as situations when a different drug may need to be considered.
  • Enbrel Overdose
    Although it is rare, it is possible to take too much Enbrel. This portion of the eMedTV Web site describes some of the factors that will affect an Enbrel overdose and highlights some of the potential treatment options available.
  • Enbrel Risks
    Although most people have no problems with this drug, Enbrel use can be risky in some people. This eMedTV article explores this topic in more detail, discussing a few side effects and safety precautions to be aware of, with a link to more information.
  • Enbrel Safety
    This eMedTV page explains that in order to ensure the drug's effectiveness, as well as your safety, Enbrel side effects should be reviewed with your healthcare provider before beginning treatment, as should precautions to keep in mind while taking it.
  • Enbrel Side Effects
    This eMedTV page discusses potential side effects of Enbrel, including injection site reactions, general weakness, and headaches. This page also covers some of the more serious side effects that need to be reported to your healthcare provider.
  • Enbrel Uses
    This eMedTV resource discusses how Enbrel works to relieve the symptoms of certain inflammatory conditions that affect the joints or skin. This page also explains how the medication is used in children and outlines some of the off-label Enbrel uses.
  • Enbrel Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at some Enbrel warnings and precautions, such as the potential risk of dangerously low blood counts and the risk of developing certain nervous system conditions. This page also covers who should avoid the drug.
  • Enbrell
    Enbrel is a drug used to reduce symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, plaque psoriasis, and other conditions. This eMedTV page explains how Enbrel works and lists common side effects of the medicine. Enbrell is a common misspelling of Enbrel.
  • Enbril
    This eMedTV article explains that Enbrel treats certain inflammatory conditions of the joints and skin. This page describes how Enbrel works and explains some of the factors that will determine your dosage. Enbril is a common misspelling of Enbrel.
  • Enteropathic Arthritis
    Enteropathic arthritis is a type of arthritis that occurs in people with an inflammatory bowel disease. This eMedTV resource features a detailed overview of this condition, including information about symptoms it may cause and how they are treated.
  • Epidural Catheter (Hip Replacement)
    This media clip explains why an epidural catheter may be used during your procedure.
  • Etodlac
    As this eMedTV page explains, etodolac is a medicine used to reduce pain, swelling, inflammation, and stiffness. This page discusses how etodolac works and describes the factors that may affect your dosage. Etodlac is a common misspelling of etodolac.
  • Etodolac
    Etodolac is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that is used to treat arthritis symptoms and general pain. This eMedTV resource explains how the drug works and offers more detailed information on its specific uses, overdose symptoms, and more.
  • Etodolac Medication
    Etodolac, a prescription drug, is used to treat pain, inflammation, and other symptoms. This eMedTV article tells you what you need to know about this medication, with details on how etodolac works and factors that will affect your dose.
  • Etodolac Side Effects
    This eMedTV article provides a list of common side effects of etodolac, including nausea, gas, and diarrhea. Rare side effects, such as anemia or asthma, are also listed, as well as serious side effects that should be reported to a healthcare provider.
  • Etodolac Uses
    Common uses of etodolac include the treatment of various arthritis symptoms and general pain. As this eMedTV article explains, the drug can also be used to reduce pain related to bone, muscle, or tendon injury or inflammation.
  • Etodolak
    This eMedTV Web article offers an overview of etodolac, a drug used to reduce pain, inflammation, and stiffness. This page also discusses some general precautions to be aware of before taking the drug. Etodolak is a common misspelling of etodolac.
  • Excessive Bone Formation Following Hip Replacement
    Extra bone may form after your hip replacement. The information presented in this portion of the eMedTV archives explains the possibility of excessive bone formation following hip replacement surgery and how it may be treated.
  • Facts About Rheumatoid Arthritis
    This eMedTV selection has facts about rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease. It takes a look at the most common symptoms of this condition and how they typically appear. Also included is a link to more information.
  • Flurbiprofen
    Flurbiprofen is a prescription drug licensed to relieve rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis symptoms. This eMedTV resource offers more information on this medication and its effects, dosing guidelines, and potential side effects.
  • Flurbiprofen Dosing
    Typically, flurbiprofen dosing starts at 200 mg daily, taken in several doses throughout the day. This eMedTV article discusses dosing in more detail and offers tips on taking the medication (such as always taking it as prescribed).
  • Flurbiprofen Tablets
    People with arthritis pain may benefit from taking flurbiprofen tablets. This selection from the eMedTV site has more information on this medication, including how to take it, side effects that may occur, and more.
  • Foods That Cause Gout
    There are no foods that cause gout. But this eMedTV page lists some foods that can raise the risk of developing gout (such as liver and other organ meats), and also explains how diet can contribute to gout attacks in people who already have gout.
  • Foods to Avoid With Gout
    As this eMedTV segment explains, people with gout should avoid certain foods; however, doing so does not mean they will never experience an attack. This article lists a few foods with both high and low level purine levels, and explains the significance.
  • Fractures (Total Knee Replacement Risks)
    This multimedia clip explains the risk of fractures associated with total knee replacement.
  • Fractures and Knee Replacement Surgery
    While uncommon, it is possible to fracture bones during or after total knee replacement. The information in this eMedTV page deals with fractures and knee replacement surgery, including possible treatment options, such as a repeat surgery or a bone graft.
  • Fractures During Hip Replacement Surgery
    It is possible -- although rare -- to experience a fracture during a total hip replacement surgery. This eMedTV resource discusses how these things happen and how they are typically treated, such as with repeat surgery or cables.
  • Generic Actemra
    At this time, there are no generic versions of Actemra (tocilizumab). This eMedTV Web page offers an explanation of why the medication is not available in this form and discusses the possibility of generic versions becoming available in the future.
  • Generic Adalimumab
    There may never be a generic adalimumab available because the medication is considered a "biologic." This eMedTV page explains why generic biologics are not manufactured and also warns people about companies claiming to sell so-called generic versions.
  • Generic Arava
    As this eMedTV segment explains, generic Arava (leflunomide) is currently available and comes as 10-mg and 20-mg tablets. This article further explores generic Arava products and explains whether the generics are as good as the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Arthrotec
    As explained in this eMedTV Web selection, Arthrotec (diclofenac/misoprostol) is available in generic form. This article takes a closer look at these generic products, including who makes them and whether they are as good as the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Cataflam
    This eMedTV article talks about generic Cataflam, which is sold under the name Diclofenac Potassium tablets and is available in one strength. This article covers the drug's uses and lists some of the companies that manufacture it.
  • Generic Celebrex
    This eMedTV article explains that generic Celebrex is currently unavailable, as the medication is protected by a patent until 2014. After the patent expires, it is expected that many companies will start producing a generic version of the drug.
  • Generic Daypro
    Two forms of generic Daypro are available -- Oxaprozin caplets and Oxaprozin tablets. As this section of the eMedTV library explains, these generic products are manufactured by several drug companies, but are only available in a single strength.
  • Generic Diclofenac
    Many, but not all, forms of diclofenac are available in generic form. This eMedTV Web page lists the various forms and strengths that are available for generic diclofenac and explains which products are not available in generic form at this time.
  • Generic Dolobid
    This portion of the eMedTV archives talks about generic Dolobid, which is sold under the name Diflunisal tablets. This page also lists some strengths in which the drug is available.
  • Generic Duexis
    There are no generic Duexis (ibuprofen/famotidine) products available. This eMedTV resource explains when a generic version might become available and discusses whether this combination drug is cheaper than taking the two active ingredients separately.
  • Generic Enbrel
    This portion of the eMedTV library explains why there may never be a generic Enbrel available. This page also warns that any place claiming to sell a generic version of the drug is selling a product that is unregulated and may be dangerous.
  • Generic Etodolac
    As this section of the eMedTV library explains, generic etodolac products are used for various muscle and joint conditions, and come in a number of strengths, from 200 mg to 500 mg. The generic versions are available in either tablet or capsule form.
  • Generic Gengraf
    Are you looking for "generic Gengraf"? This eMedTV Web page explains that Gengraf is actually a generic version of another drug. However, this does not mean the products are interchangeable. This page also describes how the FDA rates generic drugs.
  • Generic Ibuprofen
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, generic ibuprofen is sold under several names, including Ibuprofen tablets, Ibuprofen capsules, and Ibuprofen caplets. This article discusses prescription and non-prescription strengths of generic forms of ibuprofen.
  • Generic Imuran
    Currently, generic Imuran is available under the names Azathioprine tablets and Azasan tablets. This eMedTV article lists the various strengths of generic Imuran that are available and explains why the FDA assigned the drug an "AB" rating.
  • Generic Indomethacin
    Generic indomethacin is now available in a number of different forms. This section of the eMedTV library discusses the generic versions of this drug and lists some of the manufacturers who produce them.
  • Generic Kineret
    There are currently no generic Kineret products available on the market. As this section of the eMedTV Web site explains, certain laws and rules that generic versions of this medication from being manufactured at this time.
  • Generic Krystexxa
    At this time, there are no generic versions of Krystexxa (pegloticase). This eMedTV Web page offers an explanation of why this medication is not available in this form and discusses the possibility of generic versions becoming available in the future.
  • Generic Lodine XL
    Generic Lodine XL is sold under the name Etodolac Extended-Release tablets. As this portion of the eMedTV Web site explains, generic Lodine XL products are available in a variety of strengths, including 400 mg, 500 mg, and 600 mg.
  • Generic Mobic
    As this eMedTV article explains, generic versions of Mobic are available in three strengths. This Web resource lists companies that manufacture the generic versions and explains how the generics are available in tablet and liquid form.
  • Generic Nabumetone
    As this eMedTV article explains, generic nabumetone is sold under the name Nabumetone tablets. This article lists some companies that manufacture the generic version and also lists strengths in which the drug is available.
  • Generic Naprelan
    At this time, there is no generic Naprelan. As this eMedTV page explains, Naprelan is protected by a patent that expires in 2014. This article also warns against buying so-called generic versions of Naprelan until the patent expires.
  • Generic Naproxen
    Generic versions of naproxen are sold under the names Naproxen tablets and Naproxen oral suspension. As this eMedTV resource explains, prescription generic naproxen medicines are also available in several different strengths and forms.
  • Generic Naproxen Sodium
    As this section of the eMedTV library explains, generic naproxen sodium is available as either a prescription or over-the-counter drug and comes in three different strengths. The drug is sold under the name Naproxen Sodium tablets.
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