Arthritis Articles A-Z

Generic Piroxicam - Gout Treatments

This page contains links to eMedTV Arthritis Articles containing information on subjects from Generic Piroxicam to Gout Treatments. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Generic Piroxicam
    This part of the eMedTV library offers an overview of generic piroxicam, which is sold under the name Piroxicam capsules. This page lists companies that manufacture generic versions, as well as some strengths in which the drug is available.
  • Generic Remicade
    This eMedTV Web page explains why there may never be a generic Remicade available. This page also warns that any place claiming to sell a generic version of the drug is selling a product that is likely fake and possibly dangerous.
  • Generic Simponi
    At this time, there are no generic versions of Simponi (golimumab). This portion of the eMedTV library offers an explanation of why this is the case and discusses the possibility of generic versions becoming available in the future.
  • Generic Sulindac
    As this eMedTV article explains, generic sulindac is sold under the name Sulindac tablets. As this page explains, the drug is available in two strengths and is often used to treat pain and inflammation caused by things like gout and muscle strain.
  • Generic Tylenol
    A wide variety of generic Tylenol products is available. This portion of the eMedTV Web site explains what names these generic products may be sold under and explains whether the generic version is equivalent to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Uloric
    A patent currently prevents any generic Uloric (febuxostat) from being manufactured. This eMedTV page explains when a generic version of Uloric may become available and describes the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
  • Generic Vimovo
    At this time, there are no generic versions of Vimovo (naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium). This eMedTV Web selection takes a look at when a generic Vimovo might become available and explains whether this combination drug provides any cost savings.
  • Generic Voltaren
    This eMedTV segment offers an overview of generic Voltaren, which is sold under the name Diclofenac Sodium tablets. This segment lists uses for the drug, companies that manufacture it, and the strengths in which it is available.
  • Generic Voltaren Gel
    There are no generic Voltaren Gel products available at this time. This eMedTV article discusses why no generic versions of this medication are available and explains the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
  • Generic Xarelto
    At this time, no generic Xarelto (rivaroxaban) products are available. This selection from the eMedTV Web library discusses when generic versions might be manufactured and explains why you should not buy a generic version from another country.
  • Generic Xeljanz
    You cannot buy a generic Xeljanz (tofacitinib) product at this time. The reasons for this are covered in this eMedTV Web selection, with details on why a generic version has not yet been made and whether one will become available at a later date.
  • Generic Zydone
    This segment from the eMedTV archives takes a look at generic Zydone. It explains why no generic versions of the drug are currently available, explores if they ever will be, and compares Zydone to generic hydrocodone/APAP.
  • Gengraf
    Gengraf is a type of immunosuppressant used to treat psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis. As this eMedTV article explains, it can also help prevent rejection after an organ transplant. Side effects, dosing, and safety concerns are also discussed.
  • Gengraf 100 Mg
    Various forms and strengths of Gengraf are available, including 100-mg capsules. This eMedTV resource lists the different formulations that can be prescribed, briefly describes conditions this drug can treat, and links to more information on this topic.
  • Gengraf and Breastfeeding
    This segment of the eMedTV archives takes a look at the possible risks when a woman who is breastfeeding uses Gengraf. It includes the manufacturer's recommendations and lists the possible problems that could occur in the nursing infant.
  • Gengraf and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV resource describes the circumstances under which a woman who is pregnant may take Gengraf (even though the drug likely presents some risk). The results of giving Gengraf to pregnant animals in research studies are also included.
  • Gengraf and Psoriatic Arthritis
    This eMedTV resource explains that Gengraf is not approved to treat psoriatic arthritis, but healthcare providers can still prescribe it for this use. This article explores the safety and effectiveness of using this drug for psoriatic arthritis.
  • Gengraf Dosage
    Various factors help determine a person's Gengraf dosage, which this eMedTV segment describes in detail. Guidelines for the various Gengraf uses are discussed, as are tips to ensure a safe, effective treatment process with this immunosuppressant.
  • Gengraf Drug Information
    This selection of the eMedTV library provides some basic drug information on Gengraf, an immunosuppressant used to prevent organ rejection and treat certain inflammatory conditions. This page includes safety precautions and links to more information.
  • Gengraf Drug Interactions
    Because Gengraf can react with so many drugs, a detailed list of interactions is provided in this eMedTV article. It includes many of the medicines that can interfere with Gengraf, the problems that may result, and how they might be avoided.
  • Gengraf for Psoriasis
    One of the many treatment options for psoriasis is Gengraf, a type of immunosuppressant. This eMedTV article takes a brief look at using this drug for psoriasis, with information on when it is prescribed and why Gengraf is not a cure.
  • Gengraf Generic Medication
    This eMedTV selection explains that the medication Gengraf is a generic version of another brand-name drug. This segment describes how this relates to the original version, provides some basic drug information, and includes a link to more details.
  • Gengraf Overdose
    When a person takes a Gengraf overdose, "pumping the stomach" may be required. This eMedTV article explains that treatment options will depend on how recently the overdose occurred and what symptoms are present, such as tachycardia or kidney problems.
  • Gengraf Side Effects
    This eMedTV Web page explains that in clinical studies, the most commonly reported Gengraf side effects included high blood pressure; tremor; and an overgrowth of coarse, dark facial and body hair. Serious adverse reactions are also listed.
  • Gengraf Uses
    There are two primary uses for Gengraf, which are discussed in detail in this eMedTV resource. The drug can relieve active, severe cases of psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis, and can also help prevent rejection after certain organ transplant procedures.
  • Gengraf Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV resource explains that because Gengraf weakens the immune system, you may be more susceptible to infections while on it, including potentially serious infections. Other important Gengraf precautions and warnings are included in this article.
  • Getting Rid of Gout
    This eMedTV page explains that although a person with gout may not be able to get rid of it permanently, the chances of experiencing another attack can certainly be minimized. This page lists some risk factors and provides a few prevention strategies.
  • Getting Started (Hip Replacement)
    This video clip highlights several things to be aware of as you prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Knee Arthroscopy With Synovectomy)
    This video clip discusses what you need to know as you prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Total Knee Replacement)
    This video clip highlights several things to be aware of as you prepare for your procedure.
  • Glaucosamine
    Glucosamine is a supplement used for many purposes, but most often for the treatment of arthritis. This eMedTV segment explains how glucosamine works and lists some of its potential side effects. Glaucosamine is a common misspelling of glucosamine.
  • Glocosamine
    Glucosamine is a supplement most commonly used as a treatment for arthritis. This page on the eMedTV site describes the effects of glucosamine and explains whether side effects are likely to occur. Glocosamine is a common misspelling of glucosamine.
  • Glocosomine
    Glucosamine is a dietary supplement claimed to be effective for the treatment of arthritis. This eMedTV page explains what glucosamine is derived from and explores the effectiveness of this product. Glocosomine is a common misspelling of glucosamine.
  • Gloucosamine
    Glucosamine is a supplement claimed to be useful for the treatment of arthritis. This eMedTV page explores the effects of glucosamine and explains whether it is effective as an arthritis treatment. Gloucosamine is a common misspelling of glucosamine.
  • Glucosamin
    Glucosamine, a dietary supplement, is a popular treatment for osteoarthritis. This eMedTV page describes how glucosamine works and explains what to discuss with your doctor before using the product. Glucosamin is a common misspelling of glucosamine.
  • Glucosamina
    Glucosamine supplements are commonly used for treating osteoarthritis. This eMedTV Web page describes the benefits of glucosamine and includes general warnings and precautions for the product. Glucosamina is a common misspelling of glucosamine.
  • Glucosamine
    Glucosamine is a supplement used for treating various conditions, but is especially useful for arthritis. This eMedTV resource describes the effects of glucosamine, explores its effectiveness, and explains what side effects may occur with the product.
  • Glucosamine and Breastfeeding
    Women are generally advised to avoid glucosamine when breastfeeding. This article from the eMedTV Web site offers a more in-depth look at this topic and discusses some of the possible risks of using glucosamine supplements while nursing.
  • Glucosamine and Pregnancy
    At this time, it is not known whether glucosamine products are safe for pregnant women. This eMedTV resource provides more information on glucosamine and pregnancy, and discusses whether the supplement is likely to cause problems.
  • Glucosamine Benefits
    Glucosamine is often claimed to be beneficial for treating glaucoma and osteoarthritis. This eMedTV Web page lists other possible glucosamine benefits and discusses the effectiveness of the supplement when used as a treatment for osteoarthritis.
  • Glucosamine Dosage
    The recommended glucosamine dosage is 1500 mg once daily (or 500 mg three times daily). This eMedTV article offers more detailed glucosamine dosing information and includes tips on finding a reliable supplement from a reputable manufacturer.
  • Glucosamine Drug Interactions
    Warfarin, acetaminophen, and diabetes medications may cause negative glucosamine drug interactions. This eMedTV segment lists other products that may interact with glucosamine and describes the potentially serious effects that could occur.
  • Glucosamine Overdose
    Little is known about the possible symptoms and effects of a glucosamine overdose. This part of the eMedTV library explores some of the likely effects and explains what treatment options are available should an overdose occur.
  • Glucosamine Safety
    People with high blood pressure or high cholesterol may not be able to take glucosamine safely. This eMedTV article contains other glucosamine precautions and warnings, and describes potential complications that may occur with this product.
  • Glucosamine Side Affects
    Potential glucosamine side effects include nausea, diarrhea, and heartburn. This eMedTV article lists other side effects, including possible signs of an allergic reaction. Glucosamine side affects is a common misspelling of glucosamine side effects.
  • Glucosamine Side Effects
    Potential glucosamine side effects include drowsiness, diarrhea, and heartburn. This page from the eMedTV Web site lists other possible side effects of the supplement, including signs of an allergic reaction (such as a rash, wheezing, or itching).
  • Glucosamine Supplement Information
    Glucosamine, a dietary supplement, is well known as a treatment for arthritis. This eMedTV page provides some basic information on glucosamine, such as how it works and what types of side effects may occur while taking this supplement.
  • Glucosemine
    The dietary supplement glucosamine is most often used to treat arthritis. This eMedTV resource describes glucosamine in more detail and explains how it may work for the treatment of arthritis. Glucosemine is a common misspelling of glucosamine.
  • Glucosimin
    Glucosamine is a popular dietary supplement that is believed to be beneficial for arthritis treatment. This eMedTV article explores the possible benefits and effectiveness of glucosamine supplements. Glucosimin is a common misspelling of glucosamine.
  • Glucosimine
    Glucosamine is a dietary supplement believed to be effective for treating arthritis. This eMedTV article explains what glucosamine supplements are derived from and describes how the product works. Glucosimine is a common misspelling of glucosamine.
  • Glucosmaine
    Glucosamine, a dietary supplement, is often claimed to be useful for treating arthritis. This eMedTV resource describes the different types of glucosamine and explores its effectiveness. Glucosmaine is a common misspelling of glucosamine.
  • Glucosmine
    Many people take glucosamine supplements for the treatment of arthritis. This eMedTV page explains who should talk to their doctors before using these supplements for this or any other condition. Glucosmine is a common misspelling of glucosamine.
  • Glucosomine
    Glucosamine is a dietary supplement often used for the treatment of arthritis. This eMedTV Web page explains what you should discuss with your doctor before taking any glucosamine supplements. Glucosomine is a common misspelling of glucosamine.
  • Gluecosamine
    Glucosamine is a dietary supplement that can be beneficial for relieving arthritis symptoms. This eMedTV article describes the supplement in more detail and explores its effectiveness for arthritis. Gluecosamine is a common misspelling of glucosamine.
  • Gluecosomine
    Glucosamine is a supplement that is believed to be beneficial for the treatment of arthritis. This eMedTV article explores the effectiveness of this product and explains how glucosamine may work. Gluecosomine is a common misspelling of glucosamine.
  • Glycosamine
    Glucosamine is a "natural" supplement often claimed to be useful for treating arthritis. This eMedTV segment explains what these supplements are made from and describes how they work. Glycosamine is a common misspelling of glucosamine.
  • Gout
    Gout occurs when too much uric acid builds up in the body. This eMedTV article provides information on how often this condition occurs and who it affects, and also outlines the four stages (including asymptomatic hyperuricemia and acute gout).
  • Gout and Uric Acid
    This selection from the eMedTV archives explains the connection between high levels of uric acid and the development of gout. It addresses a few other risk factors for this condition and includes a link to more information on this subject.
  • Gout Diagnosis
    This eMedTV segment explains why it can be difficult to diagnose gout. The article also covers some of the tests and procedures that a healthcare provider may use when making a diagnosis, including a blood test to look at uric acid levels.
  • Gout Diet
    A diet for people with gout aims to reduce the amount of uric acid in the body. As this eMedTV article explains, gravy, liver, and trout are a few of the foods to avoid if you have gout. Fruits and diary are among the foods you can eat as desired
  • Gout Disease
    High levels of uric acid can lead to the disease gout, which causes painful inflammation in the joints. This eMedTV resource provides a brief overview of this condition, describing possible symptoms, treatment options, and how diet affects it.
  • Gout Disease
    As this eMedTV page explains, gout is a disease that often causes pain, stiffness, and inflammation in the joints. This article gives a brief overview of this condition and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Gout in Ankle
    Different locations in which a person can experience signs of gout include the ankle, knee, or big toe. This eMedTV segment describes possible symptoms of this condition, other areas of the body they affect, and the goals of treatment.
  • Gout in Foot
    As this eMedTV page explains, one of the body parts that can be affected by gout is the foot, including the ankle, big toe, or instep. This article describes possible symptoms of gout, what causes them, the goals of treatment, and more.
  • Gout Information
    This segment of the eMedTV archives provides important information on gout, which is a type of arthritis. This page discusses some of the symptoms, what causes it, and the goals of treatment, with a link to an in-depth article on this condition.
  • Gout Medications
    Commonly prescribed medicines for gout include NSAIDs and colchicine. This selection from the eMedTV archives offers an in-depth look at the products that are used to treat gout and to prevent future attacks of gout.
  • Gout Medicine
    This eMedTV resource briefly describes the different gout medicines used to both treat and prevent attacks. It also explains why these medications are not combined in the early stages of treatment and includes a link to more information.
  • Gout Pain Relief
    Some medicines are used to provide relief from the pain of gout attacks; others are used to prevent attacks. This eMedTV article takes a look at these different types of drugs, explains treatment for gout, and links to more information on this topic.
  • Gout Prevention
    Some of the ways to prevent gout include exercising regularly and eating a healthy, well-balanced diet. This eMedTV offers an overview of prevention strategies, as well as a list of risk factors for gout.
  • Gout Relief
    The selection from the eMedTV library describes the different ways of providing relief from gout symptoms. It discusses the types of drugs used and the different approaches to treating gout, and also includes a link to more information on this topic.
  • Gout Remedies
    Medications are among the most common gout remedies, as this page of the eMedTV Web site explains. This page describes the goals of treatment, discusses a few of the drugs used to treat gout, and links to more information on this subject.
  • Gout Risk Factors
    Being male, being overweight, and drinking too much alcohol are some of the risk factors for gout. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at these risk factors and explains the importance of keeping uric acid levels from getting too high.
  • Gout Stages
    This eMedTV page covers the four stages of gout -- asymptomatic hyperurecemia, acute gout, interval or intercritical gout, and chronic tophaceous gout. This page takes a closer look at the stages and explains how they are different.
  • Gout Symptoms
    Joint swelling and a sudden onset of intense joint pain are a few common gout symptoms. This eMedTV page covers common places where signs and symptoms of this condition occur (such as the big toe) and factors that can trigger an acute gout attack.
  • Gout Treatments
    The first step in treating gout is making an accurate diagnosis. This eMedTV page lists drugs commonly used as treatments, including NSAIDs (which treat acute gout) and allopurinol (which can prevent future gout attacks).
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