Arthritis Articles A-Z

Imuran Warnings and Precautions - Kineret for Rheumatoid Arthritis

This page contains links to eMedTV Arthritis Articles containing information on subjects from Imuran Warnings and Precautions to Kineret for Rheumatoid Arthritis. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Imuran Warnings and Precautions
    Imuran can increase your risk of certain types of cancer and can interfere with your immune system. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at other important Imuran warnings and precautions, including a list of those who should not take the drug.
  • Imuron
    This eMedTV page explains that Imuran is approved for preventing kidney transplant rejection and treating rheumatoid arthritis. This page also offers general precautions for taking the prescription drug. Imuron is a common misspelling of Imuran.
  • In The Hospital After Total Hip Replacement
    This video clip covers what to expect in the hospital after reconstruction surgery.
  • In The Hospital After Total Knee Replacement
    This video clip covers what to expect in the hospital after reconstruction surgery.
  • In the Operating Room (Knee Arthroscopy With Synovectomy)
    This video segment explains what will happen in the operating room just before your procedure begins.
  • Inbrel
    This eMedTV page explains that Enbrel treats inflammatory conditions of the joints and skin, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis. This page explains how Enbrel works and explains when to take the drug. Inbrel is a common misspelling of Enbrel.
  • Indometacin
    Indomethacin is a drug that may be used to relieve pain, fever, inflammation, and swelling. This eMedTV article provides a brief overview of the medication and offers a link to more information. Indometacin is a common misspelling of indomethacin.
  • Indomethacin
    Indomethacin is a prescription drug that is used to relieve pain and inflammation. As this eMedTV page explains, indomethacin may also be used to reduce fever, swelling, and stiffness caused by arthritis or other painful conditions.
  • Indomethacin Drug
    If you have osteoarthritis pain, your healthcare provider may recommend a drug called indomethacin. This eMedTV selection takes a closer look at this NSAID, with details on how it works, safety precautions, and more.
  • Indomethacin Side Effects
    Common indomethacin side effects may include abdominal pain, diarrhea, and dizziness. This segment on the eMedTV Web site discusses possible side effects of this medication, including rare but serious health problems that may occur.
  • Indomethacin Uses
    As this eMedTV article explains, indomethacin is used to relieve arthritis symptoms, gout symptoms, and shoulder pain. This page discusses these uses of indomethacin and identifies possible off-label uses of the drug.
  • Indomethacine
    Indomethacin is a prescription pain medication that belongs to the class of drugs called NSAIDs. This eMedTV segment covers indomethacin uses and explains how this drug works for pain relief. Indomethacine is a common misspelling of indomethacin.
  • Indomethican
    Indomethacin is an NSAID used for relieving pain caused by arthritis and other conditions. This eMedTV resource describes how indomethacin works and explains what side effects may occur. Indomethican is a common misspelling of indomethacin.
  • Indomethicin
    Indomethacin is a medication used for treating symptoms of various types of arthritis. This eMedTV article explains how this drug works, describes its effects, and lists its potential side effects. Indomethicin is a common misspelling of indomethacin.
  • Infection (Total Knee Replacement Risks)
    This video segment discusses the level of risk for infection associated with this procedure.
  • Infection After Total Knee Replacement
    In about 1 to 2 out of every 100 total knee replacements, an infection occurs. This eMedTV Web page discusses the range of infections that can occur and explains how they may be treated with antibiotics or a repeat surgery.
  • Infection With a Total Hip Replacement
    It's possible to develop an infection following total hip replacement. However, as this page of the eMedTV library explains, this complication occurs only rarely. This page explains where infections can occur and how they are typically treated.
  • Infectious Arthritis
    Infectious arthritis is a catch-all term describing joint inflammation caused by germs. This article on the eMedTV Web site describes some of the different types, such as septic arthritis, and explains how they are diagnosed and treated.
  • Infectious Arthritis Causes
    There are bacterial, viral, and fungal causes of infectious arthritis. This portion of the eMedTV archives provides examples of bacteria, viruses, and fungi that may cause this condition.
  • Infectious Arthritis Information
    Looking for information on infectious arthritis? This eMedTV page talks briefly about this condition, explaining what causes it, who is at risk, and how it is treated. A link to more in-depth information is also provided.
  • Infectious Arthritis Symptoms
    Severe joint pain, fever, and a rash are possible symptoms of infectious arthritis. This page from the eMedTV library explains that the symptoms a person has can differ, depending on the type of infectious arthritis and its cause.
  • Infectious Arthritis Treatment
    In cases involving infectious arthritis, treatment may involve medications and joint drainage or surgery. This eMedTV article explains how different types of infectious arthritis are treated and includes links to additional information.
  • Info on Rheumatoid Arthritis
    Rheumatoid arthritis generally occurs in a symmetrical pattern. This eMedTV selection offers a brief overview of this condition, including a list of common symptoms. A link to more info on rheumatoid arthritis is also included.
  • Information About Rheumatoid Arthritis
    Joint pain, swelling, and stiffness are common symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. This eMedTV Web page gives an overview of rheumatoid arthritis and its symptoms, and includes a link to more details on this condition.
  • Information on Azulfidine EN-Tabs
    Are you looking for information on Azulfidine EN-tabs? This eMedTV resource is a great place to start. It discusses the conditions this drug can treat, how they compare to the regular version, and what to tell the healthcare provider prescribing it.
  • Information on Gout
    This eMedTV segment gives a brief overview of gout, a condition that occurs when uric acid builds up in the blood. Symptoms of gout, treatment options, and risks factors are discussed, and a link to more information is provided.
  • Is Celebrex an Opiate?
    This selection of the eMedTV library explains that Celebrex is not an opiate. This segment describes the drug class to which Celebrex belongs, briefly explains how it works, addresses why its use should still be limited, and links to more information.
  • Is Cod Liver Oil Safe?
    Cod liver oil may increase the risk of bleeding and can modestly decrease blood pressure. This eMedTV page explains other important cod liver oil safety concerns to be aware of before using the supplement and offers tips on how to buy a safe product.
  • Is Ibuprofen an Opiate?
    As this selection from the eMedTV Web site explains, ibuprofen is not an opiate -- it belongs to an entirely different class of drugs. This page tells what this class is, briefly explains how the drug works, and offers a link to more information on it.
  • Is Mobic a Narcotic?
    As this eMedTV Web segment explains, Mobic is a type of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), rather than a narcotic. Mobic, as this article discusses, works to treat pain and inflammation by blocking certain hormones in the body.
  • Is Motrin Ibuprofen?
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Motrin is an ibuprofen product commonly used to treat pain from menstrual cramps, arthritis, and other conditions. This article explains how ibuprofen works for pain relief and provides a link to more information.
  • Is Naproxen an Opiate?
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, naproxen is a type of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), rather than an opiate. Naproxen, as this article discusses, works to treat pain and inflammation by blocking certain hormones in the body.
  • Jengraf
    Gengraf is effective in preventing organ rejection and relieving symptoms of two inflammatory conditions. This eMedTV selection presents a brief overview of this medication, with a link to more information. Jengraf is a common misspelling of Gengraf.
  • Juvenile Arthritis
    The most common type of arthritis that affects children is juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. This page from the eMedTV site gives a brief overview of this condition, with details on symptoms, causes, and more.
  • Juvenile Rhematoid Arthritis
    Children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis may experience joint pain and swelling. This eMedTV resource lists other symptoms and explains how to treat the disease. Juvenile rhematoid arthritis is a common misspelling of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Juvenile Rheumatoid Artharitis
    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is the most common type of arthritis that affects children. This eMedTV page lists symptoms and treatment goals of this condition. Juvenile rheumatoid artharitis is a common misspelling of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthirtis
    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is a type of arthritis that occurs in children. This eMedTV article lists common symptoms and treatment options for this condition. Juvenile rheumatoid arthirtis is a common misspelling of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritas
    Children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis have joint inflammation or stiffness for more than six weeks. This eMedTV page further explores this type of arthritis. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritas is a common misspelling of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthrithis
    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that affects children ages 16 or younger. This eMedTV segment explains how to treat this type of arthritis. Juvenile rheumatoid arthrithis is a common misspelling of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis
    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis causes prolonged joint inflammation in children younger than 16. This eMedTV article provides an overview of this condition, including information about its symptoms and how they are treated.
  • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis Symptoms
    Common signs and symptoms of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis include joint swelling, pain, and stiffness. This eMedTV segment talks more about the possible symptoms of this disease and also discusses their progression.
  • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthrtis
    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease that affects children ages 16 or younger. This eMedTV page describes the effects of this type of arthritis. Juvenile rheumatoid arthrtis is a common misspelling of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Juvenile Rhuemetoid Arthritis
    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is the most common form of arthritis seen in children. This eMedTV segment offers a brief look at this condition and its symptoms. Juvenile rhuemetoid arthritis is a common misspelling of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Juvenile Rhumetoid Arthritis
    As this eMedTV article explains, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is a condition that may cause joint pain and swelling in children 16 years of age or less. Juvenile rhumetoid arthritis is a common misspelling of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Juvenille Arthritis
    As this eMedTV segment explains, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by joint swelling and stiffness in a child 16 years of age or younger. Juvenille arthritis is a common misspelling and variation of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Kineret
    Kineret is a rheumatoid arthritis medication that is prescribed when other drugs have failed to work. This eMedTV page describes how this medication works, offers dosing information, and explains what else it can be used for.
  • Kineret and Breastfeeding
    At this time, no studies have been conducted on the link between Kineret and breastfeeding. As this eMedTV page explains, since it is not known whether the drug passes through breast milk, consult your doctor before using it while breastfeeding.
  • Kineret and Pregnancy
    Kineret is generally considered safe for use during pregnancy. As this eMedTV resource explains, studies on Kineret and pregnancy show that the drug did not cause any problems when it was given in high doses to pregnant animals.
  • Kineret Dosage
    The recommended Kineret dose for most people taking it for rheumatoid arthritis is 100 mg once a day. This eMedTV segment also includes dosing recommendations for people with NOMID and offers helpful tips for those taking the medicine.
  • Kineret Drug Interactions
    When live vaccines or TNF inhibitors are used with Kineret, drug interactions could occur. This eMedTV Web page offers more information on these interactions and explains what may happen when these drugs are taken together.
  • Kineret for Rheumatoid Arthritis
    Rheumatoid arthritis that has not responded to other medications may be treated with Kineret. This eMedTV Web page gives an overview of this drug, explaining how it works and how to use it. A link to more details is also included.
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