Rheumatoid Arthritis Medication

Drugs used to treat rheumatoid arthritis include four different classes of medications: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), and biological response modifiers. Among the things that a healthcare provider should take into account when prescribing a medication for rheumatoid arthritis are the person's general condition, the length of time he or she will take the medicine, and the medicine's effectiveness and potential side effects.

Rheumatoid Arthritis Medication: An Overview

Most people who have rheumatoid arthritis take medications. Some of these medications are used only for pain relief; others are used to reduce inflammation. Still others are used to try to slow the course of the disease. Some important considerations to take into account when rheumatoid arthritis medication is prescribed include the person's general condition, the current and predicted severity of the illness, the length of time he or she will take the medicine, and the medicine's effectiveness and potential side effects.

 

Medications for rheumatoid arthritis fall into different classes:
 
  • Analgesics (pain relievers), including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)
  • Corticosteroids
  • Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs)
  • Biological response modifiers.

  

Analgesics and Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Medications (NSAIDs)

Analgesics relieve pain; NSAIDs relieve pain and reduce inflammation. Some common pain relievers and NSAIDs include:
 

 

Top Foods to Fight Inflammation

Information About Rheumatoid Arthritis

Referring Pages:
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2014 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.